from the editor

  • less is less

    Shy about promoting themselves as a one-stop shopping answer and leery of exposure to litigation, architects have ceded much of their livelihood to a host of consultants with chutzpah.

     

home front

  • word on the street, redux

    In the aftermath of the economic crash, the 10 firms featured in residential architect's January/February 2009 cover story, "Word on the Street," struggled mightily. See how they're doing now.

     

green piece

  • light touch

    This 1,490-square-foot residence by Shipley Architects balances on a couple of steel beams, a few inches above the earth.

     

green pieces

  • Hide in Plain Sight

    This innovative floating floor from TORLYS is made from 65 percent postindustrial leather scraps.

     
  • fiber supplement

    Made specifically for re-insulation applications, GreenFiber offers R-values ranging from 13 to 60.

     
  • Twice as Nice

    Eternal Condensing Hybrid water heater offers the benefits of tank and tankless systems.

     
  • Pulp Fact

    Suberra 100 percent recycled cork surfacing can be used as a countertop or work surface.

     
  • Happy Landings

    Bio-Luminum tiles are made from 100 percent aircraft aluminum alloy.

     

k+b studio

bath

  • hidden glow

    Pale, reflective surfaces and a strategically situated skylight flood a windowless master bath in daylight.

     

kitchen

  • speaking volumes

    In a Boston loft the firm dubbed "Urban Living XXL," this kitchen/great room serves as the central gathering place.

     

practice

  • home sweet office

    If you've considered abandoning your commercial digs for the comfort and low overhead of home, you're not alone. The number of home-based entrepreneurs is likely to boom over the next few years.

     

profiles

  • John Holmes and Jeff Stuhr of Holst Architecture in front of the Sunrose Condos on East Burnside St. in Portland, Oregon on January 15, 2010.  Model Released.

    art you can build

    The principals of Holst Architecture are shaking up Portland, Ore.'s industrial roots with sensitive, head-turning multifamily design executed frugally and efficiently.

     

projects

  • Four units open onto balconies hollowed from the buildings bricklike mass. Bands of red cedar siding add texture to the clapboard faade.

    gift box

    Built at a cost of only $100 per square foot, this urban infill project replaced a dilapidated industrial building with appealing and affordable condominiums.

     
  • In a nod to the surrounding row houses, each ground-level unit has its own front entrance.

    good fit

    The Lacey condos continue the progressive spirit of a historic Washington, D.C., neighborhood.

     
  • The steel-and-painted-brick structure is the buildings defining architectural ornament; cedar soffits and a cedar screen add warmth. To retain the 50-foot height allowance for commercial zoning, the developer added an 1,800-square-foot office on the ground floor.

    school ties

    The Miller|Hull Partnership teams with local firm Osterhaus McCarthy to fulfill developer's vision for a Chicago School-inspired glass-and-steel condo building in Chicago's Bucktown neighborhood.

     

shelter lab

  • With its simple forms, strategic window placement, and super-efficient building shell, G¢OLogics prototype house minimizes both up-front cost and operating expenses. Shown: Prototype A.

    savings plan

    Using innovative design and construction methods, Maine design/build firm G?OLogic produces a zero-energy single-family home for $150 per square foot.

     

doctor spec

  • tall order

    How do you spec durable, high-performing windows for a multifamily project? Very carefully.

     

products

new material

  • transition team

    New line brings the warmth of wood to a modernist style.

     
  • pound wise

    The Lb3 bath suite features three style families to suit personal tastes.

     
  • rain maker

    Aquavolo Duetto from JACLO switches from rain shower to waterfall flow.

     
  • /dataVolumes/ripro01.1.1/TIF x Macintosh/?INDEX-P65.tif

    single file

    The burners on Italy-based Binova's Fires Line cooktop are arranged in a straight line.

     
  • metal dip

    The Atocha soaking tub is made from at least 90 percent recycled copper.

     
  • right turn

    Turnbuckle adds an architectural touch to cable railings.

     

workspace

  • A built-in teak furniture piece provides guest seating, storage, a work surface, and even a planter.

    nicole migeon architect

    Flexible space and attention to detail are the keys to New York architect Nicole Migeon's East Village office.