• Andrew Maynard’s second-generation “global rescue station” is designed to allow tree-sitting environmental activists to protect more forests from logging.
    Andrew Maynard’s second-generation “global rescue station” is designed to allow tree-sitting environmental activists to protect more forests from logging.
Tree-sitters protesting logging in southwestern Tasmania's Styx Valley forest have relied on a rudimentary platform suspended from branches by rope. Although the so-called Global Rescue Station has made small strides in preventing some logging, its success has been hampered by the structure's inherent limitations.

Enter Melbourne, Australia-based Andrew Maynard (no relation to this writer), an architect and Tasmania native who has a strong interest in ecology in general and in preserving trees in particular. The principal of Andrew Maynard Architects is proposing a second-generation GRS—one that can be installed in multiples to serve as a more formidable deterrent to logging. “It's a conceptual investigation that extrapolates the tactics employed by GRS ‘generation 1,'” he explains.

To wit, Maynard designed “GRS 2” to spread its load over three trees rather than one, thereby protecting a larger number of trees per structure and reducing the burden upon individual trees. Unlike “GRS 1,” the new structure will protect activists from inclement weather. It can sleep up to three people and has a composting toilet and sink that uses water collected from the roof. And, of course, the view is tremendous.