sustainable: single-family

  • stone unturned

    Candid Rogers, AIA, fell in love with a two-room stone house built in 1873. When the architect decided to renovate the tiny structure as his own home, he honored its intimate feel with a similarly compact 960-square-foot addition.

     
  • web-exclusive: the green roof decision

     
  • yanonali court, santa barbara, calif.

    This Santa Barbara, Calif., infill project stands out for achieving LEED Platinum and doubling the area's typical density, but it also blends smoothly with the neighborhood's Sp

     
  • native sun

    One trickle-down effect of the green revolution is the growing recognition that social and economic sustainability should be part of the picture. KRDB of Austin, Texas, aims to cover those bases at SOL (Solutions Oriented Living), a mixed-income community

     
  • street smart

    Sophisticated landscaping techniques will also turn the streets into stormwater-management tools.

     
  • above it all

    Located on 27 acres in the mountains of Upper Tract, W.V. (about 160 miles from Washington, D.C.), the 196-square-foot retreat is the work of Jeffery Broadhurst, AIA, who wanted a simple weekend retreat for himself, his wife, and their daughter.

     
  • lago vista guesthouse, beverly hills, calif.

    “Green! So many projects are serious, and this one is fun,” enthused a judge. He was referring to the strangely clad cube that rises up on the edge of a wide canyon.

     
  • rock star

    The environmental arguments against owning a second (or third) home seem irrefutable. An extra house perforce consumes extra building resources and operating energy, not to mention the fossil fuels used for transportation to and from the beach, mountains, or countryside. But the flip side of this...

     
  • elbe pirouette

    Sensitive urban revitalization often goes hand in hand with sustainability. When an underpopulated neighborhood blossoms, its city becomes denser and more resource-efficient.

     
  • new heights

    To satisfy the world's growing housing needs in a sustainable way, many experts are recommending building up, not out. Whether that approach translates into structures of six or 60 stories, it will certainly result in denser neighborhoods, which generally consume fewer resources than sprawling ones...

     
 
 
 
 
 
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