infill

  • Four units open onto balconies hollowed from the buildings bricklike mass. Bands of red cedar siding add texture to the clapboard faade.

    Merge Architects' Penn Street Lofts Bring High-Style Urban Living Within Reach

    Built at a cost of only $100 per square foot, this urban infill project replaced a dilapidated industrial building with appealing and affordable condominiums.

     
  • In a nod to the surrounding row houses, each ground-level unit has its own front entrance.

    Division1 Architects Designs a Modern Condo Building in Washington, D.C.

    The Lacey condos continue the progressive spirit of a historic Washington, D.C., neighborhood.

     
  • The steel-and-painted-brick structure is the buildings defining architectural ornament; cedar soffits and a cedar screen add warmth. To retain the 50-foot height allowance for commercial zoning, the developer added an 1,800-square-foot office on the ground floor.

    1615 N. Wolcott's Design Team Captures the Essence of Early Chicago School Architecture

    The Miller|Hull Partnership teams with local firm Osterhaus McCarthy to fulfill developer's vision for a Chicago School-inspired glass-and-steel condo building in Chicago's Bucktown neighborhood.

     
  • internal logic

    “The only lots left to build on in San Francisco are these impossible lots that nobody can build on,” says architect Craig Steely. Well, almost nobody.

     
  • alley appeal

    What began as a conversation about the brutalities of gentrification in urban neighborhoods may result in a new type of housing in Austin, Texas.

     
  • urban infill 02, milwaukee

    The Case Study Houses of the mid-20th century continue to serve as architectural touchstones, even in settings utterly unlike their original sun-drenched sites. In Milwaukee, they've helped inspire a series of moderately priced infill houses designed by B

     
  • prototype infill housing: throckmorton site, dallas

    Edward M. Baum, FAIA, says the design for this prototype duplex housing is a creative solution to the 50-foot-by-150-foot infill sites common in Dallas, and he's optimistic it can be adapted to other cities.

     
  • risky business

    For Jill Salter and her artist husband, simplicity, cost and construction were their guides for navigating the building of their home.

     
  • open wide

    Nothing worth doing is easy, right? Well, the limitations of this Seattle infill site would daunt most mortals: The steep urban lot is deemed a “critical area” in danger of mudslides. Its southern exposures—crucial to passive-solar benefits—face a freeway.

     
  • southside story

    Chattanooga, Tenn., has attracted global attention for its ongoing downtown revitalization. Support from the local political, business, and nonprofit communities has helped fuel the city's turnaround. But small infill buildings like this artists' studio,

     
 
 
 
 
 
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