ra50: Robert M. Gurney, FAIA

washington, d.c.

Robert M. Gurney works modern details into traditional projects.

 

Robert M. Gurney, FAIA

  • The Six House Tours at Reinvention 2014

    Photos from the residential project tours at this year's Reinvention conference in Washington, D.C.

     
  • Award-Winning Custom Outdoor Projects

    Custom Home editors have compiled a slideshow featuring the winners in the Outdoor Spaces and Accessory Building categories from our recent Custom Home Design Awards.

     
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    Nevis Pool and Garden Pavilion, Bethesda, Md.

    A modern pavilion negotiates the space between manicured and natural landscapes.

     
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    308 Mulberry, Lewes, Del.

    Four linked pavilions double the living space in a historic house.

     
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    Hampden Lane House, Bethesda, Md.

    This project shows the power of a simple cube.

     
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    Lujan House, Ocean View, Del.

    Our judges admired the quality of light and clean materials used for this house on the Chesapeake Bay.

     
  • The owner requested a compact building footprint to maximize the outdoor space.

    Hampden Lane House, Bethesda, Md.

    Our judges praised the composition, materials, and the porch of this suburban infill project by Robert M. Gurney.

     
  • Watergate Apartment, Washington, D.C.

    The Watergate's famous circular geometry posed interior challenges for Robert M. Gurney, FAIA, Architect.

     
  • Gurney enlarged the 1876 home's rooms to better suit them to the client's modern art collection. He kept the original woodwork profiles within the existing footprint.

    Residence e2, Washington, D.C.

    The clients for this Washington, D.C., renovation have young children and a modern art collection—both of which tend to thrive in open floor plans.

     
  • announcing the winners of rada 2010!

    The 11th annual residential architect Design Awards received 978 entries in 16 categories. Just 26 projects were singled out for accolades, making RADA the most competitive residential architecture awards program in the country. The jury comprised six distinguished architects, including Ed Binkley...

     
  • a trio of new architecture titles, reviewed

     
  • Town House, Washington, D.C.

    Converted long ago to office space, this townhouse in the heart of Washington, D.C.'s downtown commercial district seemed an unlikely candidate for a return engagement as a residence.

     
  • Suite 4511, Washington, D.C.

    Asked to design a simple bathroom makeover, architect Robert M. Gurney and project designer Claire L. Andreas instead combined an existing master bedroom, bath, and closet into a single continuous space.

     
  • Harkavy Residence, Potomac, Md.

    Much of the ground floor of this exurban house opens to its wooded site via floor-to-ceiling glass.

     
  • Peterson Residence, Chevy Chase, Md.

    As remodeling candidates, some houses offer architects more to work with than others.

     
  • Buisson Residence, Lake Anna, Va.

    A wooded point of land on the shore of Virginia's Lake Anna presented architect Robert M. Gurney and project designer Claire L. Andreas with the perfect stage for this strikingly sculptural weekend retreat.

     
  • a bath undivided

    The open floor plans so commonly seen in homes' public living spaces in recent years are finding their way into private areas as well.

     
  • Great Falls, Va., Residence

    Though the owners of this renovated kitchen dwell in a Craftsman-style house, their imaginations had been captured by Modernism.

     
  • ontario 301, washington, d.c.

    When it came time to liberate her dark, disorienting apartment in a Beaux-Arts building, this client—a psychiatrist—prescribed an orderly, austere environment, perhaps as an antidote to the daily hazards of her practice.

     
  • urbane infill

    Nearly 1,500 square feet of storage space atop a bakery and parking garage was the starting point for this apartment by Robert M. Gurney, FAIA. Along the way he also had to contend with the historic Washington, D.C., neighborhood's building restrictions—n

     
 
 
 
 
 
 
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