More Profiles

  • michael g. imber, faia

    A few years ago, Michael G. Imber, FAIA, was approached about working on a large development. His firm designs primarily high-end custom residential and has since its inception in 1992, so Imber thought carefully before accepting the offer.

     
  • chuck swartz, aia, leed ap, and beth reader, aia

    Reader & Swartz Architects was founded during a recession. “Beth got laid off and I had the brilliant idea of quitting and starting our own firm,” says Chuck Swartz, AIA, LEED AP.

     
  • word on the street

    As creeping paralysis makes its way across the U.S. economy, residential architects are beginning to feel parts of their practices go numb.

     
  • el dorado verbatim

    additional thoughts from el dorado's principals.

     
  • thinking & making

    It's not easy for an outsider to catch the folks at el dorado in an entirely serious moment. The Kansas City, Mo., firm's five partners recently used the 1980s hair band Def Leppard as a reference point in an architectural lecture. The group's offbeat, deadpan sense of humor harmonizes with their...

     
  • a clear logic

    Eric Cobb's focus is on structure, simplicity, and surprise. His houses respond to the topology of the land while engaging it lightly. They're often thrust over a steep slope or wetland and rotated toward a chosen view—and not always the predictable one. Materials are abstract, durable, readily...

     
  • articulating the minimal

    Brian Messana, AIA, and Toby O'Rorke, RIBA have been practicing the art of minimalism since opening for business in 1996. They've developed a keen eye for the calming qualities of space and light, and a reputation for quiet, nuanced innovation.

     
  • urban outfitter

    Sebastian Mariscal develops, designs, and builds—one project at a time.

     
  • a passion for craft

    Anne Fougeron, AIA, is the kind of architect who follows her endless enthusiasm for design, and it has taken her to far-flung places. “The Pantheon is one of my favorite buildings,” she says. “I had to stop breathing when I saw it for the first time.” A v

     
  • cover story: after the storm

    In this report, we've endeavored to illuminate the good and the bad, the true signs of hope and the harsh realities of its absence. Over and over, Gulf Coast architects emphasize that people around the country need to know what's really going on in this still-devastated but still-compelling area.

     
 
 
 
 
 
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