Launch Slideshow

A look at the studio's Roman Holiday pattern

A look at the studio's Roman Holiday pattern

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A new collection from Clé Studio is designed to make an impression on interior and exterior floors and walls. Inspired by Moroccan patterns, the concrete tiles put new twist on an old-school hot-wax painting technique formerly used to achieve the same look. Now, designers pour colored cement rather than hot wax atop a concrete substrate, creating a 1/8-inch layer of pigmented color. The line’s 12 designs come in standard gray, black, and white on 8-inch-by-8-inch square or hexagonal profiles, or in a combination of 30 available colors on 8-inch-by-8-inch square profiles. Clé Studio. www.cle.com. 415.887.9011.

In an earlier version of this article, we explained that the designers painted the tiles using hot wax, an age-old "encaustic" practice. Thank you to the reader who pointed out that modern "encaustic" tiles use colored cement rather than hot wax. We regret the error.