Launch Slideshow

The 25-foot-long Airstream currently is parked on a residential site in Santa Barbara, Calif.

mobile hot spot

A remodeled Airstream trailer provides a cozy, portable live/work space.

mobile hot spot

A remodeled Airstream trailer provides a cozy, portable live/work space.

  • Architect Matthew Hofmann restored his Airstream's aluminum skin to its gleaming original state.

    http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmp1A55%2Etmp_tcm48-824445.jpg

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    Architect Matthew Hofmann restored his Airstream's aluminum skin to its gleaming original state.

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    Matthew Hofmann

    Architect Matthew Hofmann restored his Airstream's aluminum skin to its gleaming original state.

  • Bamboo coutertops and floors brighten the trailer's interior, as does a recycled-glass tile shower space.

    http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmp1A56%2Etmp_tcm48-824454.jpg

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    Bamboo coutertops and floors brighten the trailer's interior, as does a recycled-glass tile shower space.

    600

    Matthew Hofmann

    Bamboo coutertops and floors brighten the trailer's interior, as does a recycled-glass tile shower space.

  • Hofmann's workspace also serves as his dining area and guest room.

    http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmp1A57%2Etmp_tcm48-824463.jpg

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    Hofmann's workspace also serves as his dining area and guest room.

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    Matthew Hofmann

    Hofmann's workspace also serves as his dining area and guest room.

  • The 25-foot-long Airstream currently is parked on a residential site in Santa Barbara, Calif.

    http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmp1A58%2Etmp_tcm48-824472.jpg

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    The 25-foot-long Airstream currently is parked on a residential site in Santa Barbara, Calif.

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    Matthew Hofmann

    The 25-foot-long Airstream currently is parked on a residential site in Santa Barbara, Calif.

Airstream trailers have long enjoyed popularity among architects and the architecturally inclined. When Matthew Hofmann, LEED AP, purchased and remodeled his own vintage 1978 Airstream, he liked it so much that he decided to make it his full-time residence. Not only does the Santa Barbara–based architect live in the 160-square-foot trailer, but he also uses it as his firm’s office.

The key to residing and working in such a small space, Hofmann says, is making sure every object serves more than one purpose. His main work area—consisting of a built-in dinette, a computer, and a printer stowed in a custom drawer—doubles as his dining area, and the seating converts to a guest bed. He tries to keep papers to a minimum, preferring to conduct business with digital files and documents as much as possible. “Anything you leave out turns to clutter really quickly,” he says.

Following a complete interior renovation, Hofmann restored the trailer’s original polished aluminum exterior. His handiwork inside and out has drummed up new business; after seeing his Airstream, several clients have asked him to customize their own trailers.