Firm

  • cloning your practice

    Michael Woodley, AIA, leads a double life. An avid ice hockey fan, he has season tickets to see the Colorado Avalanche in Denver and the Mighty Ducks in Anaheim, Calif. He's an active member of the AIA and the Building Industry Association in Orange Count

     
  • dream teams

    Santa Monica, Calif.-based Pugh + Scarpa calls itself a boutique firm—smallish, creative, and eclectic in the kinds of jobs it likes to take on. Its portfolio includes an array of nationally acclaimed work—from the sculptural Dwell House II and the energy

     
  • after hours

    An intern who is halfway through the licensing exams, Dan Nicely, Fargo, N.D., is experienced in the dark side of architecture. He graduated in 1998 and soon found his way to an architecture firm that does primarily retail work.

     
  • checks and balances and checks

    When we had the brilliant idea to do an issue on design/build firms, we thought we'd given ourselves an easy summer assignment. We'd already planned a cover story on multi-talented Marmol Radziner and Associates, so picking a few other like-minded firms for our design portfolio seemed like a...

     
  • the enemy within, part 2

    In our last issue, I wrote about the divide between commercial architects and residential practitioners—about how the former sometimes regard the latter as the lesser professionals. Well, I'm afraid there's also a schism within the residential practice itself—between the custom architect and the...

     
  • dotting the i's

    When a partner leaves, the most contentious issue may be the potential loss of clients and employees.

     
  • breaking the circle

    With partner-level turnover increasingly common, smart firms have devised exit agreements that make things easier for everyone.

     
  • the enemy within

    It's time architects of every discipline understand residential architecture for what it really is: everyone's most intimate connection with architecture.

     
  • both sides now

    I've been talking with residential architects about the difficulty of making services affordable to a wider range of clients. Apparently the excuse that the American public doesn't appreciate what architects do is getting weaker and weaker. More and more architects are turning away work. Why...

     
  • the name game

    When journalists observe something unusual, they make a mental note of it. If they see it again, they think they've discovered a trend. Three times, and they'll probably write about it.

     
 
 
 
 
 
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