Island Paradigm

With the Menemsha Pond house, Hutker explored the sculptural beauty of structure. The tepee-like shape of the combination living/dining/kitchen area relates to the site’s Native American roots.

After 13 years as an associate in the firm, Phil Regan (left) is now Hutker’s partner. Regan loves the traditional work as much as Hutker loves the modern projects. Hutker based the Menem­sha Pond house (above, right) on Native American traditions of the round house and long house.

The Dog Fish Bar residence is a simple, beautiful response to the site and program. “Cottages are so sweet, so charming,” says Hutker. “Their smaller scale allows an intimacy, a direct relationship to the land.”

The back side of Eel Pond house cocks an eyebrow to its water view. The clients requested a formal, elegant house; Hutker and Regan responded with a “Chanel suit.”

Hutker’s early work, as demonstrated in the Spring Point residence, had a Post­modern flair. His current work reflects a more personal re­sponse to the needs and opportunities of each project.

The Sengekontacket Pond residence, which predates Slough Cove, articulates a similar agrarian vernacular. Hutker calls it “weathered silhouettes in the landscape.” A pegged timber frame and insulated stressed-skin panels balance the desire to expose structure and the need to protect it from the elements.

The Sengekontacket Pond residence, which predates Slough Cove, articulates a similar agrarian vernacular. Hutker calls it “weathered silhouettes in the landscape.” A pegged timber frame and insulated stressed-skin panels balance the desire to expose structure and the need to protect it from the elements.

Instead of “trophy houses,” Hutker seeks to design “heirloom houses”: “They should have an emotional effect, and a quality of materials, construction, and sensible design that makes them timeless.” The Slough Cove compound is Hutker’s most fully realized heirloom project to date.

Instead of “trophy houses,” Hutker seeks to design “heirloom houses”: “They should have an emotional effect, and a quality of materials, construction, and sensible design that makes them timeless.” The Slough Cove compound is Hutker’s most fully realized heirloom project to date.

Mark Hutker’s design for the Menemsha Pond house attracted more conceptual projects to the firm.

Join the Discussion

Please read our Content Guidelines before posting

Close X