Last week, the design world mourned the sudden loss of Zaha Hadid. The Iraqi-British architect was 65 when she passed in Miami while being hospitalized for bronchitis and then suffered from a heart attack. She was widely regarded as a trail blazer in architecture, seeing that she was the first woman to win the Pritzker Prize and RIBA's Royal Gold Medal—in her own right. Rem Koolhaas, the Dutch architect who won the Pritzker in 2000 and founder of OMA, once said she was “a planet in her own inimitable orbit,” according to a New Yorker article.

And while she had her had in about every realm of design, ranging from major commercial projects to jewelry, her curvaceous, space-age designs also shook up the residential landscape. Standing as memorials for her ground breaking work, some of the most notable sites include 520 West 28th Street in New York; Esfera City Center in Monterrey, Mexico; and CityLife, created with her good friend Daniel Libeskind, in Milan.

The residential complex designed by Zaha Hadid Architects is more curvaceous in form than Libeskind’s, with wood inlays set around the concrete structure.
Michele Nastasi The residential complex designed by Zaha Hadid Architects is more curvaceous in form than Libeskind’s, with wood inlays set around the concrete structure.

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