Launch Slideshow

kitchen: fusion fashion

kitchen: fusion fashion

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    The merging of cork and bamboo flooring signals the transition from kitchen to dining areas. The curvaceous dividing line is reflected by a similarly sinuous groove cut into the ceiling plane.

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    Douglas Hill

    What you donÕt see in this cosmopolitan kitchen are details ranging from the conscientious to the sublime: a built-in composter beneath the custom cutting board (above) neatly eliminates waste and a mirror above the cantilevered sink (right) becomes a giant TV screen with the flick of a switch.

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    Douglas Hill

    What you don’t see in this cosmopolitan kitchen are details ranging from the conscientious to the sublime: a built-in composter beneath the custom cutting board (above) neatly eliminates waste and a mirror above the cantilevered sink (right) becomes a giant TV screen with the flick of a switch.

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    Douglas Hill

Troy Adams relied on his fusion philosophy to generate a sophisticated, yet comfortable, space in this high-profile kitchen for architect Jim Chuda. Mixing a variety of materials, Adams merged edgy European sleekness with the calming natural elements common in Asian design. He started from the ground up: “We knew we wanted a cork floor, so we started picking materials that would fit into the palette of the cork,” he says. Popular in European and commercial kitchens, cork floors reduce the impact of constant standing. As the open kitchen moves into the dining area, the flooring changes to renewable bamboo. A testament to Adams' approach, the two floors flow fluently into each other, integrating both materials and influences.

Corrugated cherry wood on a condensed wall of cabinets pulls out the red hues of the variegated cork. For the island, Adams chose a dark wenge; Makassar ebony on the floating sink cabinet unites the dark and light woods with its distinctive striping. To help this amalgam of woods cooperate rather than compete, enameled and raw lavastone are woven together on the island countertop, resulting in a vivid focal point for the room.

“Because the kitchen was so exposed, we wanted to hide as much as possible,” Adams explains. To wit, he elevated the dishwasher, used undercounter refrigerator drawers, and hid the microwave, oven, cappuccino maker, and more inside stainless appliance garages. To balance this minimalist European look, Adams incorporated an Asian technique of bringing the outdoors in. “We oriented the kitchen so you're experiencing the nature beyond,” he says. Pushing back and tilting the L-shaped island toward the window gives the cook and hangers-on unobstructed views to the outside. And a built-in water fountain of basalt granite supplies the soothing sounds of a bubbling brook.

designers: Troy Adams and Lisa Adams, Troy Adams Design, West Hollywood, Calif.

architect: Jim Chuda, Los Angeles

general contractor: Troy Adams

installer: Marlow Barger, Barger Construction Co., Pasadena, Calif.

steel fabricator: Julien, Quebec City

stone fabricator: Zohar Marble, North Hollywood, Calif.

resources: cabinetry and hardware: Studio Becker; cooktop, dishwasher, and oven: Miele; countertops: Basaltina S.r.l. and Pyrolave; lighting: Hera Lighting; paint: Benjamin Moore & Co. and Dunn-Edwards Corp.; plumbing fixtures: Dornbracht; refrigerator and freezer: Sub-Zero; sink: Kohler