More stories about custom / 3

  • gardiners bay beach house, amagansett, n.y.

    Fred Stelle, AIA, has boldly done what few architects dare to do—he's designed a house that plays second fiddle to its Long Island, N.Y., waterfront site. A lovely duet ensues.

  • r3, san diego

    Lloyd Russell, AIA, was thinking of New York City's Flatiron Building when he decided to tackle this weird triangular lot, just 2,000 or so feet from a San Diego International Airport runway and next to one of the city

  • kansas longhouse, rural douglas county, kan.

    This rural Kansas project reminded the jury of Australian architect Glenn Murcutt's work. “There's something about the strength, beauty, and simplicity of this house that is just wonderful,” said one judge.

  • assembled residence, east hampton, n.y.

    By assembling a series of prefabricated components, Paul Masi, AIA, created a well-crafted, interactive building that can adapt to the owner's lifestyle changes.

  • solar umbrella, venice, calif.

    Sure, this solar-powered house costs almost nothing to run. But what most impressed the judges was its thoughtful site analysis and the way the landscape slips in and out of the house.

  • house on beverly ranch road, beverly hills, calif.

    The orderly floor plan at this bold modern residence captured the judges’ attention. So did its restrained materials palette and spotless execution.

  • ski house, sugar bowl, calif.

    At once deeply practical and cleverly articulated, this house in the Sierra Nevada Mountains is designed to withstand earthquakes and the 12-foot snow loads that are standard in this part of the country.

  • house on the connecticut river, essex, conn.

    Architect Chad Floyd’s house sits on the north cove of the Connecticut, River, in a colonial-era shipbuilding town.

  • additions to historic west st. mary's manor, st. mary's county, md.

    The orderly floor plan at this bold modern residence captured the judges’ attention. So did its restrained materials palette and spotless execution. “It doesn’t have a flaw,” marveled one judge, speaking of the entire project.

  • delta shelter, mazama, wash.

    Tom Kundig, FAIA, likes concrete and steel because they are indestructible materials, and the fact that many of the parts used in this tiny cabin could be fabricated off site and bolted together quickly and inexpensively.