More stories about Sitework

  • a clear logic

    Eric Cobb's focus is on structure, simplicity, and surprise. His houses respond to the topology of the land while engaging it lightly. They're often thrust over a steep slope or wetland and rotated toward a chosen view—and not always the predictable one. Materials are abstract, durable, readily...

  • top firm: stephen muse, faia

    Taking a visitor on a tour of his work one sunny afternoon at the end of summer, Stephen Muse, FAIA, steered his Audi through an Upper Northwest Washington, D.C., community, where several examples of his architecture stand like good neighbors, contributin

  • sarasota serene

    Guy Peterson's office sits in the middle of Sarasota's creative hub—just blocks from Sarasota Bay, with its string of resplendent keys.

  • embedded architecture

    It seems that countries known for their vast natural landscapes produce architects with an extraordinary sensitivity to site. Think Australia's Glenn Murcutt, whose buildings sit lightly on their fragile ecosystems. Or Brian MacKay-Lyons, FAIA, who's known for plainspoken materials and forms that...

  • on site and in mind

    Construction observation, also known as contract administration, is a phase of architecture that's clearly spelled out in AIA contracts. And yet it's a minefield, fraught with missteps by architects, interference from contractors, and nuances clients often fail to understand.

  • prospecting

    My firm, Hutker Architects, has a multifaceted marketing program. One key ingredient is our Web site. It took a good deal of capital and person-hours to create, and the site continues to require attention to remain fresh.

  • painting on fridays

    Jeremiah Eck started his residential practice in Boston with $30 in his pocket and little more than a pencil to draw with. Twenty-eight years later, the firm is thriving and Eck, FAIA, has taken up a paintbrush, retreating to his backyard studio each Friday to work on his landscape canvases.

  • playing the stock-plans market

    The next best thing to cloning yourself is to clone your plans, tweaking the design to make it appealing to a variety of clients and sites.

  • Tree House

    At $200 per square foot, this San Diego house might seem a long shot for a story about custom homes on a budget.