More stories about Infill

  • profile: wayne troyer, aia

    In the weeks after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans architect Wayne Troyer, AIA, bounced between friends' houses in Alabama and Louisiana. All the while, he frantically awaited the latest news of his home city. “I e-mailed like crazy ... we were all trying to regain our sanity,” he recalls. When he...

  • profile: byron mouton, aia

    Byron Mouton, AIA, never intended to stay in his hometown of New Orleans. He left for graduate school at Harvard in Cambridge, Mass., then worked in Europe for a couple of years. On his way to San Francisco for a job interview in 1997, he stopped to see his family in the Crescent City and stayed...

  • risky business

    For Jill Salter and her artist husband, simplicity, cost and construction were their guides for navigating the building of their home.

  • open wide

    Nothing worth doing is easy, right? Well, the limitations of this Seattle infill site would daunt most mortals: The steep urban lot is deemed a “critical area” in danger of mudslides. Its southern exposures—crucial to passive-solar benefits—face a freeway.

  • southside story

    Chattanooga, Tenn., has attracted global attention for its ongoing downtown revitalization. Support from the local political, business, and nonprofit communities has helped fuel the city's turnaround. But small infill buildings like this artists' studio,

  • fitting in

    In many parts of the country, we're running out of buildable land for single-family housing. The solution in my neck of the woods is the teardown or infill house.

  • working the system

    William Adams Architects has made its name designing small, innovative multifamily infill. So when charged with creating a six-unit condo building for a tight site near its Venice, Calif., office, the firm knew just what to do.

  • hideaway village

    You'd be surprised where and what you can build when you think on top, between, and inside the boxes.

  • residential architect design awards

    How do you add or replace housing where it's needed, with sturdy construction, pleasing architecture, and, most important, day-to-day livability? This question was foremost in our jurors' consciousness as they embraced three projects for Project of the Ye

  • city rhythms

    Urban infill is perhaps the most important housing typology an architect can pursue. Not only does it promote density, it repairs decaying communities, creates new neighborhoods, and utilizes existing infrastructure.