More stories about In-House Design

  • eastern market row house, washington, d.c.

    The glass volume in this Washington, D.C., row house immediately calls to mind the famous quip that God is in the details.

  • house on the connecticut river, essex, conn.

    Architect Chad Floyd’s house sits on the north cove of the Connecticut, River, in a colonial-era shipbuilding town.

  • Top Firm: Frank Harmon Architect

    Frank Harmon has won his fair share of accolades for design over the years. But no occasion evoked such a pointed reaction to his work as the judging of the entries for AIA North Carolina in 1999, when Harmon swept the competition by winning three out of four Honor Awards in his home state.

  • light from both sides

    David Salmela's modernism honors the past, the human need for comfort and warmth, and the north country's fleeting sun. A self-described modernist who admits, with a hint of bewilderment, to being controversial, Salmela routinely creates sophisticated houses that blend his own proclivity for...

  • right to the end

    Marmol and Radziner refine the art and craft of design/build. The two of them thrive on interaction—with clients, with colleagues, with the public, and with their own staff. Which works out well, because running perhaps the most sophisticated residential design/build firm in the country leaves...

  • reinvention revisited

    When we first conceived of “Reinvention 2004: The Next American House” early last year, we envisioned a small event, hoping to attract 100 architects who were passionate about improving mainstream house design. Apparently, the time was right to do this because we closed the doors at 300 people—our...

  • esherick's insights

    Early in my architectural life, while working at the San Francisco firm Esherick Homsey Dodge & Davis Architecture, I was assigned to a series of house projects with Joseph Esherick, FAIA. I was acquainted with Joe from architecture school at the University of California, Berkeley, and had spoken...

  • a manifesto

    The majority of Americans live in poorly designed homes that are haphazardly sited, thoughtlessly constructed, and, in some cases, hazardous to their health.

  • where's the architect?

    I'm not sure which is worse, a builder-tweaked plan house or a client's kit-of-parts house, cobbled together by a general contractor's in-house draftsperson. At least with the plan house I can imagine an architect started the whole ball rolling at some point in its history.

  • natural laws

    Most architects think traditional design and detailing techniques are a boring cop-out. Similarly, many academics find blunt prose simplistic. Plain language is indeed comparable to accepted building techniques—direct and to the point, with acknowledged meanings and proven results. Just like florid...