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More stories about Formaldehyde-Free Products

  • Transparent Future

    Materials & Resources chair Malin discusses how transparency will permeate the world of building products, giving us nutrition-label-like sustainability data on everything we use.

  • Insulation Blower from Rotobrush International

    The RotoStorm II offers easy portability and durability.

  • Green Chemistry

    Green chemistry is the next key ingredient in the search for sustainable products.

  • Drs. Julian and Raye Richardson Apartments

    San Francisco / David Baker + Partners

  • Merit Award: Labron Residence, Dallas

    A modern take on a treehouse, this home's second-level great room, window walls, and balconies keep residents connected to lush outdoor space.

  • orient expressed

    One of their company's first vanities, The Chinatown, is made from Forest Stewardship Council-certified maple, formaldehyde-free MDF, and low-VOC paint.

  • screen dreams

    Japanese sliding doors from German shoji manufacturer Shoji Living are now distributed in the United States. Crafted of vertical-grain Douglas fir recovered from managed forests, the handmade screens can be speced with three different facings: polyester-reinforced paper, PVC-laminated shoji paper...

  • chop top

    Made from end-grain bamboo bonded with a formaldehyde-free and food-safe adhesive, the 1 1/2-inch-thick panels come in three standard sizes--30 inches by 96 inches, 36 inches by 72 inches, and 48 inches by 96 inches.

  • the tiles that bind

    Eco-Terr terrazzo tiles from Miami-based Coverings Etc are formed using 80 percent postindustrial stone and glass chips and a cement binder. The manufacturer claims the resulting tiles are thin, strong, and ideal for residential applications, particularly high-traffic areas.

  • from the ground up

    As public interest in eco-friendly houses grows, so too does demand for green building products. Made with ingredients that are less harsh than conventional sources, these materials are easier to live with and, presumably, healthier for the environment.