More stories about Development

  • new spaces, old places

    Brand-new suburban developments often lack the soul of established neighborhoods, which is why these older communities are perfect locations for architects to insert new projects. Many are doing just that, but instead of imposing their egos, architects ar

  • cover story: after the storm

    In this report, we've endeavored to illuminate the good and the bad, the true signs of hope and the harsh realities of its absence. Over and over, Gulf Coast architects emphasize that people around the country need to know what's really going on in this still-devastated but still-compelling area.

  • our town

    Ross Chapin, AIA, who helped draft design guidelines for his town of Langley, Wash., recalls a developer who proposed a 54-unit-per-acre downtown housing complex for the elderly. The building was 150 feet long and three stories high and had no façade chan

  • Integrating Habitats in Oregon

    A design competition for the Portland, Ore., region—called Integrating Habitats—has been established with the aim of furthering the balance between development and conservation.

  • the 505, houston

    Collaborative Designworks, Houston. James M. Evans, AIA, never set out to be a developer. But when the Houston-based architect and his wife, Catherine, couldn't find a house that appealed to them, he decided the only way to get what they wanted was to cre

  • spread the word

    Through our professional interaction with developers, contractors, city inspectors, engineers, and clients, we architects understand at a detailed level how buildings take shape out of a push-and-pull among sometimes brutal forces: not just physical force

  • reinvention redux

    At residential architect magazine's most recent conference, "Reinvention 2005: Greening the American House," attendees gathered by region to brainstorm the challenges and opportunities facing architects who wish to design more sustainably.

  • double vision

    First-time developer John Bertsch saw potential in a canyonside lot in San Diego's posh Mission Hills neighborhood, and he detected a hunger for progressive design in the local housing market.

  • good neighbors

    a group of houses may appear beautiful and well maintained, but if the houses don't contain people, it's not going to seem like much of a community.

  • change agent

    Chapin knows that the loose edges of towns, with their mind-numbing mazes of streets, cannot be improved simply by sending out talented architects. Innovative solutions must come from better planning.