More stories about Development

  • new heights

    To satisfy the world's growing housing needs in a sustainable way, many experts are recommending building up, not out. Whether that approach translates into structures of six or 60 stories, it will certainly result in denser neighborhoods, which generally consume fewer resources than sprawling ones...

  • going green, affordably

    Say green design, and what comes to mind are geothermal heat pumps, tankless hot water heaters, and roofs that plug into the sun. The most recognizable green features are also the priciest, and sustainable design is still viewed as an upgrade that only the well-off can afford. While there's some...

  • green horizon

    Those who design high-end custom homes often dream of bringing their skills to a wider audience. For Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects, this notion is no longer a fantasy.

  • riding out the slowdown

    From his temporary location in Cambridge, Mass., where he is attending Harvard University on a Loeb Fellowship, veteran architect/developer Kevin Cavenaugh bemoans the housing market's troubles.

  • elemental education

    This 3,600-square-foot surburban home isn't a typical project for Chris Pardo, principal and co-founder (with David Biddle) of Pb Elemental Architecture. The Seattle-based firm, whose specialties include design, construction, and development, normally focuses on high-density infill projects in...

  • condo conversions

    Five firms foray into residential development in five different ways. They share the bumps and boons along the road.

  • primary residence

    Five firms foray into residential development in five different ways. They share the bumps and boons along the road.

  • pro forma: single-family

    Five firms foray into residential development in five different ways. They share the bumps and boons along the road.

  • urban outfitter

    Sebastian Mariscal develops, designs, and builds—one project at a time.

  • PATH Identifies Top 10 Remodeling Technologies

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing (PATH) has chosen 10 innovative building technologies, systems, and processes to improve energy and resource efficiency in existing houses.