More stories about Daylighting

  • reinvention redux

    At residential architect magazine's most recent conference, "Reinvention 2005: Greening the American House," attendees gathered by region to brainstorm the challenges and opportunities facing architects who wish to design more sustainably.

  • keeping up with the joneses

    Today Jones Studio employs 11 people who work on jobs as varied as houses, schools, performing arts centers, and office buildings. “Everyone does everything,” says Rob Viergutz, an architect at the firm. “That's part of the appeal of working here.” Their

  • solar flair

    It's easy enough to slap solar panels onto a roof, but integrating them into a graceful residential design is a tougher assignment.

  • kitchen: bungalow unbungled

    These San Antonio homeowners adore the charm of their early-1900s bungalow and didn't want to disturb the fabric of its historic neighborhood. What they did want was a contemporary kitchen that flowed into expanded living spaces; and they sought privacy from their neighbors without losing valuable...

  • fenestra obscura

    Tacoma, Wash.–based Signamark's Privacy Door offers a center panel of opaque glass that permits light but blocks views.

  • fire wall

    Designed in England but distributed in this country by Melrose, Mass.–based European Home, the B-vent unit has a Modern sensibility.

  • no frills

    Most bath accessories offer little to the Modernist who seeks clean lines. That's why Fort Mill, S.C.–based Ginger introduced Surface shower shelves.

  • beyond the glass door

    When Kem Hinton, FAIA, and Seab Tuck, FAIA, decided to design new offices for their staff of 15, they wanted something out of the ordinary. So the owners of Tuck Hinton Architects, Nashville, Tenn., bought the Civil War-era Elm Street Methodist Church and transformed the interior with such cool...

  • natural laws

    Most architects think traditional design and detailing techniques are a boring cop-out. Similarly, many academics find blunt prose simplistic. Plain language is indeed comparable to accepted building techniques—direct and to the point, with acknowledged meanings and proven results. Just like florid...

  • norway: nordic track

    The architect of this 3,000-square-foot house in southeastern Norway, Einar Dahle, isn't one for hyperbole.