More stories about Cost-Effective Design

  • delivering the goods

    We live in a design economy encompassing everything from the iPod to Ikea. Investment in, awareness of, and appreciation for design are at an all-time high.

  • clean sweep

    These homeowners wanted big remodeling bang on a moderate budget. Designer Kevin Alter suggested focusing their dollars on frequently used spaces such as the kitchen and master bath while choosing simple but effective upgrades (like new windows and fewer

  • archimania

    When Todd Walker, AIA, founded Archimania with Jeff Blackledge, AIA, in 1995, they were strapped for cash. So their build-out in an industrial building in downtown Memphis, Tenn., tapped into their still-successful formula of doing much more with considerably less.

  • custom for less

    My wife, Sherry, and I had embarked on an experiment: to design and build a 2,800-square-foot custom home on a budget of $50 per square foot (or $300,000, including land costs). Although it seemed idealistic, we considered the task possible if we did some

  • more than shelter

    Imagine designing a home for a client who may be deaf, blind, or mobility-impaired—you're not sure which. The residence has to fit into a tiny space, say 250 square feet, and must be easy to duplicate 10, 50, or 100 times over.

  • city west: phase II, cincinnati

    When Torti Gallas and Partners took on a HOPE VI affordable housing redevelopment project in Cincinnati's West End, it didn't have to look far for a design muse.

  • soma studios and 8th + howard apartments, san francisco

    Architect David Baker isn't afraid to use color—especially in the affordable projects that he champions—but he knows from experience that bright hues can elicit all kinds of responses.

  • vision: transform containers into housing

    The iMac proved that consumers crave high design within economic reach. Architect Michael Graves achieved household-name status selling teakettles at Target. So when Robert Humble, AIA, and Joel Egan, Associate AIA, insist that prefab is about to take off because the public is demanding design...

  • prefab confab

    factory-built houses are the new darlings of the media and the architectural community, but can prefab really bring high design to mainstream housing? leaders in architectural practice and theory speak out.

  • split-level

    Hands-down, the split-level owns the title of architects' least favorite house to remodel. “It's a difficult type to work with because it's so poorly constructed, and the room sizes are way too small,” says Lane Williams, AIA, a Seattle architect who says he tries to avoid split-levels. This house...