More stories about TEXAS

  • stock exchange

    At one point or another, almost every residential architect dreams of providing well-designed, affordable homes to the masses. Some try to reach this goal through prefab, while others become developers themselves.

  • stone unturned

    Candid Rogers, AIA, fell in love with a two-room stone house built in 1873. When the architect decided to renovate the tiny structure as his own home, he honored its intimate feel with a similarly compact 960-square-foot addition.

  • tower house, leander, texas

    Rather than remodel an old one-bedroom cottage as their main house, a Texas couple asked Andersson•Wise Architects to convert it into communal living space and to build this new tower for sleeping quarters adjacen

  • cinco camp, brewster county, texas

    Rhotenberry Wellen Architects, Midland, Texas. Shipping container architecture is nothing new, but adapting the shells for living often undoes their built-in economy.

  • alley appeal

    What began as a conversation about the brutalities of gentrification in urban neighborhoods may result in a new type of housing in Austin, Texas.

  • michael g. imber, faia

    A few years ago, Michael G. Imber, FAIA, was approached about working on a large development. His firm designs primarily high-end custom residential and has since its inception in 1992, so Imber thought carefully before accepting the offer.

  • native sun

    One trickle-down effect of the green revolution is the growing recognition that social and economic sustainability should be part of the picture. KRDB of Austin, Texas, aims to cover those bases at SOL (Solutions Oriented Living), a mixed-income community

  • hall of fame: f. cecil baker, aia

    For a young architect in Philadelphia, 1972 was a bad year to be starting a business.

  • lean feat

    The goal of Rice Design Alliance and AIA Houston's 99K House Competition seems self-evident.

  • pizza porch, dallas

    The site for this northern California house begins in a meadow and continues up a wooded hill. To engage both of these aspects, architect Mark L. Donohue, AIA, divided the copper mesh-covered home into three stepped pavilions that torque to take in variou