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More stories about NEBRASKA

  • houghton residence, omaha, neb.

    One programmatic move transformed the kitchen of a traditional builder house into an urbane space that works as well for intimate dinners as it does for large parties.

  • university of nebraska students build net-zero energy house

  • modular: crabapple, omaha, neb.

    The judges marveled at the craftsmanship of the Crabapple model at Hidden Creek, a community of 12 modern houses in Omaha, Neb. "It's interesting that we're talking about craft relating to production technologies," mused one.

  • laboratory, douglas county, neb.

    When Randy Brown, FAIA, bought a 10-acre property and old house in the farm country of Omaha, Neb., he intended it to be a laboratory for experiments in how to design something so connected to the land that it looks both natural and manmade, and in how to

  • AIA Bestows 2008 Honor Awards

    Residential projects recognized

  • pro forma: single-family

    Five firms foray into residential development in five different ways. They share the bumps and boons along the road.

  • my own private iowa

    Paul Mankins, FAIA, LEED AP, connected artistically with the owner of this Des Moines, Iowa, loft right from the start. In fact, his first thought about how to approach the long, narrow shell and its panoramic skyline views resonated perfectly with the ow

  • mckinley bathroom, omaha, neb.

    When a Home Depot opened up in Omaha, Neb., it sparked a subversive idea in local architect Randy Brown's mind. "You can buy a bath there and basically plug it into your house," he says. "We decided to do the opposite."

  • p + d house, omaha, neb.

    The attention lavished on a fireplace and built-in television cabinet in this suburban remodel impressed the judges. Architect Randy Brown actually tore a hole into the side of the house to line the TV up flush with the wall.