Austin, Texas
Second Act

The Texas Society of Architects relaunched its award winning magazine Texas Architect in January, just in time for the publication’s 62nd birthday. The move comes after an organization-wide rebranding of its identity and website in 2011 by Herman Dyal, FAIA, principal of Austin-based Dyal and Partners. “The idea was to loosen up the format while also enhancing the interior navigation,” says Texas Architect’s editor Stephen Sharpe, Hon. TSA. “Our readers are visual, so it was critical that we respect their way of receiving information.” Published bimonthly, Texas Architect first appeared in 1950 as a 24-page pamphlet.

Learn more at texasarchitects.org.


Detroit
Freeze Frame

Bernard Tschumi, FAIA, famously explored the relationship between architecture, film, and the urban fabric in his 1976 “Screenplays” project. Continuing this line of inquiry, the Society of Architectural Historians has partnered with the Detroit Youth Foundation (DYF) to produce a series of videos at its annual convention this month. The videos are intended to be about more than the city, they’re about collective memory. Individual buildings, building complexes, neighborhoods, and landscapes. Detroit Historical Hotspots (as the series is called) is part of DYF’s ongoing YouthVille Detroit program.

Learn more at youthvilledetroit.org.


London
Make Time for Design

Fancy the Aston Martin? How about the Penguin paperback? Anyone for Archigram? “British Design 1948–2012: Innovation in a Modern Age” at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum tracks the country’s creative output since the fade of postwar austerity, with an eye toward the tensions that defined the 20th century: history versus modernity and craft versus mass production. The exhibition, which coincides with London’s 2012 Olympic games, will be on view until Aug. 12.

Learn more at www.vam.ac.uk.


Little Rock, Ark.
Bridge Tournament

Commercial retrofits? Sure. Houses? You bet. But how many architects get the chance to design a bridge? Randy Murphy, AIA, of Cromwell Architects, and Bob Dahms, of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, tied for first place in an ideas competition to replace Little Rock’s Broadway Bridge. Metroplan, the metropolitan planning organization which sponsored the competition, garnered more than 5,500 public votes for 10 final entries. The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department is scheduled to begin the $45 million project next year.

Learn more at metroplan.org.