Launch Slideshow

renovation / merit

A recent renovation of this 1980s house only highlighted its remaining architectural flaws. For phase two, the owners envisioned a bolder entryway, a larger living room, and a better connection to the backyard pool.

renovation / merit

A recent renovation of this 1980s house only highlighted its remaining architectural flaws. For phase two, the owners envisioned a bolder entryway, a larger living room, and a better connection to the backyard pool.

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    Paul Finkel/Piston Design

    A reinvention of this '80s house turned the dining room into a gracious vestibule and the enlarged living room and terrace into a showcase for the pool and distant views.

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    Paul Finkel/Piston Design

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    Miró Rivera Architects

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    Paul Finkel/Piston Design

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    Miró Rivera Architects

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miró rivera architects, austin

A recent renovation of this 1980s house only highlighted its remaining architectural flaws. For phase two, the owners envisioned a bolder entryway, a larger living room, and a better connection to the backyard pool. “There was no hierarchy of space relating to the lot and the size of the house,” says Miguel Rivera, AIA.

While changing the roofline was out of the question, the architects borrowed interior volume for the living room from a covered second-story deck and part of the second floor, adding clerestories and a wall of sliding glass doors. A travertine terrace steps down to the pool under a light-filtering aluminum trellis, banishing the deck and guardrail and opening the house to hill-country views. In front, an elegant vestibule replaces the wedge-shaped dining room. The front door is clad in thin copper pipe, which foreshadows the fireplace's new floor-to-ceiling copper panels.

The project's design and exquisite detailing pleased the jury. “I love the way they opened up that wedge,” said one judge.

principals in charge: Juan Miró, AIA, and Miguel Rivera, AIA, Miró Rivera Architects
project designers: Ken Jones and Mary Elizabeth Liggio, Miró Rivera Architects
general contractor: Peter Sproul, Four Corners Construction, West Lake Hills, Texas
project size: 2,041 square feet (renovation only)
site size: 2.3 acres
construction cost: Withheld
photography: Paul Finkel/Piston Design

product specs
bathroom plumbing fittings:Dornbracht Americas; bathroom plumbing fixtures:Kohler Co., TOTO USA; bathroom and kitchen cabinets: Archwood Cabinetry & Millwork; entry doors: The Wimberley Workshop; exterior siding, fireplace/wood stove: Steele Specialties; kitchen plumbing fittings:Grohe America; kitchen plumbing fixtures:Kohler Co.; lighting fixtures:BEGA/US, Cooper Lighting (Iris, RSA Lighting), Lutron Electronics Co., Tivoli; paints/stains:Benjamin Moore & Co.; patio doors, windows:Hope's Windows