Courtesy Backcountry Hut Company

In the age of KonMari and Airbnb, tiny houses and micro-units appeal to a demographic looking to minimize material possessions in favor of experiences and public spaces. Launched in 2015 and starting production this year, Vancouver-based Backcountry Hut Company designed a flat-packed, built-to-order modular house that marries efficient production with high-style minimalism. The company is a collaboration between founder Wilson Edgar, architect Michael Leckie of local firm Leckie Studio Architecture + Design, and manufacturing partner Cyrill Werlen, an owner of Cascadianwoodtech in Union Bay.

“While a flat-packed structure is intended to make assembly more accessible, the BHC design does not sacrifice the integrity of the built design,” says a spokesperson for Leckie Studio Architecture + Design.

Courtesy Backcountry Hut Company
Courtesy Backcountry Hut Company

Costing roughly $150 Canadian (about $112) per square foot before customizations, the modules can be freestanding units (a single 191-square-foot module can sleep up to four people) or be combined to form a larger house. Inside the shell, clients can go basic or high-end: The company will have interior options, but also plans to offer custom interiors from regional studios such as Lock & Mortice Build Co.

Courtesy Backcountry Hut Company
Courtesy Backcountry Hut Company

“We have had a diverse range of interest: from retirement and off-grid communities, to individuals who want to expand on their existing property with an additional residential unit, as an Airbnb enterprise, outdoor clubs and associations,” the spokesperson says.