Launch Slideshow

losa loft, san francisco

architectural interiors / grand

losa loft, san francisco

architectural interiors / grand

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    Matthew Millman

    Most of the apartment's pieces were made in the shop, reducing on-site labor costs. These include the metal stair, the floor-to-ceiling fabric scrim lining the living room wall, and the translucent plastic panels that screen the loft bedroom upstairs.

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    Matthew Millman

    Together, the Zipper and Cradle pieces define the area closest to the loft’s entry.

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    Matthew Millman

    A bilevel island, known as the Stage, provides some separation between the living room and the kitchen.

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    Matthew Millman

    In the living and dining space, the Hearth converges with the Scrim.

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    Matthew Millman

    White drywall creates an effectively blank canvas for the loft’s architectural built-ins and well-edited furniture.

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    Matthew Millman

    The Scrim bathes the loft in a soft, diffused light.

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    Aidlin Darling Design

    The loft’s floor plan before the renovation.

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    Aidlin Darling Design

    The loft’s floor plan after the renovation.

aidlin darling design, san francisco

This loft in San Francisco's Mission District was dark and cluttered before Joshua Aidlin, AIA, and his client got their hands on it. Working with a talented contractor and fabricators, they turned it into a well-organized, sunlight-filled home. “It's quite charming,” observed a judge. “For a small apartment, it has wonderful details.”

Aidlin stripped the space down to its bones and came up with a set of five key, cost-effective architectural moves—with catchy names, no less. The “Cradle,” a Douglas fir entry feature that holds home office space, bookshelves, and storage, is interwoven with the “Zipper,” a steel-and-wood stair and railing piece. The plate-steel “Hearth” anchors the living room, while the “Stage” is a bilevel, sit-down kitchen counter that lets guests witness the client's formidable culinary skills. And the “Scrim,” a wall of translucent sliding panels made from fabric stretched and stapled onto wood frames, supplies privacy and solar shading.

“The materials are very off-the-shelf,” Aidlin explains. “Instead of building a lot of infrastructure, we decided to paint everything white and just add furniture elements.”

principal in charge: Joshua Aidlin, AIA, Aidlin Darling Design;
project designer: Ethen Wood, Aidlin Darling Design;
general contractor: Monty Montgomery, McVay Construction, San Francisco;
project size: 1,530 square feet;
construction cost: Withheld;
photography: Matthew Millman.

product specs
lighting fixtures: FontanaArte Corp.; oven/range: Aga Ranges; paints/stains/wall finishes: Benjamin Moore & Co.