AIA

  • Prefinished Opening Systems: Superior Performance, Design Flexibility, Reduced Cost

    1.0 LU

    The prefinished Opening System is an opening concept, not just a product. This solution combines superior performance and design flexibility – the best of both worlds – while actually reducing the total opening cost. This course will explain how using 20 gauge prefinished steel frames as part of a prefinished opening system exceeds the performance levels of 16 gauge hollow metal frames while reducing the total opening cost up to 40%. Take the course.

    Posted:
    January 2011
    Subject(s):
    Doors
    Sponsor:
    Timely Industries
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Natural Daylighting in Architectural Spaces

    1.0 LU

    By the end of this learning unit, you will understand the importance of natural day lighting in architectural spaces and be able to define natural day lighting and understand the basic nature of light benefits. You will also be able to identify how residential windows and doors can affect climate change, and identify how day lighting impacts the workplace, the learning environment and on overall human health. Finally, you will be able to list the ways day lighting can impact LEED Green Building Certification. Take the course.

    Posted:
    January 2011
    Subject(s):
    Daylighting
    Sponsor:
    Jeld-Wen
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Sustainable Choices in Wood Door Construction

    1.0 LU HSW/SD

    This learning unit will explore the sustainable choices available for architectural wood doors. You will review the requirements for FSC certification, and how different core compositions qualify for LEED assistance. You will identify how increasing need for low-emitting products is impacting wood door manufacturers and sustainable veneer options. Take the course.

    Posted:
    January 2011
    Subject(s):
    Green Design, Windows, Doors, LEED
    Sponsor:
    VT Industries
    Certification(s):
    AIA, NARI
  • Achieving Sustainable Design Goals with Tubular Daylighting Technologies

    1.0 LU HSW/SD

    By the end of this course you should be able to describe why daylight is an important component of sustainable design. You will be able to compare and contrast the different daylighting strategies available. You will also understand the minimum requirements for achieving LEED with daylighting and cite the specific ways that tubular daylighting devices can help projects earn LEED accreditation. Take the course.

    Posted:
    January 2011
    Subject(s):
    Daylighting, Energy Efficiency, LEED
    Sponsor:
    Solatube
    Certification(s):
    AIA, NARI
  • Design Considerations for Waterproofing Systems

    1.0 LU HSW

    Design Considerations for Waterproofing Systems was developed to help architects and designers better understand single-ply thermoplastic waterproofing materials. Participants will learn the history of waterproofing, the difference between damproofing and waterproofing, the different system and assembly types, review the types of material components and attachment methods, review section details, and follow a case study from start to finish. Take the course.

    Posted:
    December 2010
    Subject(s):
    Moisture Barriers, Roofing
    Sponsor:
    Sika Sarnafil
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Design Considerations for Low-Slope Roofs

    1.0 LU HSW

    Design Considerations for Low-Slope Roofs was developed to help architects and designers better understand single-ply thermoplastic roofing materials. Participants will learn the history of thermoplastic membranes, a comparison study of the thermoplastic membranes in relationship to membrane polymer thickness, the importance of having a certain amount of polymer thickness above the reinforcement scrim, water absorption, linear dimension change, and UL fire testing. The presentation also discusses the energy-saving benefits of a white thermoplastic membrane when compared to a traditional black roofing system. Take the course.

    Posted:
    December 2010
    Subject(s):
    Roofing, Moisture Barriers
    Sponsor:
    Sika Sarnafil
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Selecting the Best Blindside Waterproofing System for Your Project

    1.0 LU HSW

    After viewing this course you should be able to determine which blindside waterproofing system is best for your project based on performance advantages and disadvantages of several systems discussed throughout the presentation. You will be able to list which tools to use in different situations; and discover tips to help you write effective waterproofing specifications. Take the course.

    Posted:
    December 2010
    Subject(s):
    Building Technology, Concrete Construction
    Sponsor:
    Carlisle
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Concrete Waterproofing with Crystalline Technology

    1.0 LU HSW

    Concrete is the primary material used to construct many above and below-grade structures. It is naturally porous and thus can absorb and weep water. For structures at or below grade where water infiltration may cause structural damage, concrete should be treated with waterproofing. This course will introduce you to concrete water proofing with crystalline technology. Take the course.

    Posted:
    December 2010
    Subject(s):
    Concrete Construction
    Sponsor:
    Xypex
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Comparing Walkable Roof Deck Membranes

    1.0 LU HSW

    This course describes types of walkable roof decks, various waterproofing options, and common problems associated with deck waterproofing; describes characteristics, advantages, and applications of walkable roof deck and outdoor flooring systems; lists important design concepts and considerations for walkable roof decks, balconies and walkways; and lists system installation considerations, common details and key issues related to specifying waterproof PVC-based roof deck and flooring membranes. Take the course.

    Posted:
    December 2010
    Subject(s):
    Decking
    Sponsor:
    Duradek
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Living Off Grid: Power Generation and Storage Basics

    1.0 LU HSW/SD

    Living off the grid—independent of power utilities—has become increasingly popular over the past decade. Getting rid of power poles and natural gas lines has become an attractive notion to many homeowners whether they have a second home designed to be a summer or winter retreat, want a permanent outpost far from the madding crowds, or simply desire to become energy independent. While the basic challenges of living off-grid haven’t changed, solutions to these challenges have made the idea of getting away from it all much easier. Take the course.

    Posted:
    December 2010
    Subject(s):
    Technology
    Sponsor:
    Propane Education and Research Council
    Certification(s):
    AIA, NARI