AIA

  • Vinyl Siding for Exteriors

    1 LU AIA

    This course is registered with AIA for 1 CEH. Vinyl siding products are the preferred exterior cladding material, in both new construction and remodeling projects because they have numerous advantages over other siding materials. Design preferences have increased the number of profiles and color choices. The sustainability of vinyl has proven significant, with products that include recycled content and environmentally friendly manufacturing procedures. Combine that with remarkable technical advances, and you have a product that looks great, is low-maintenance, and holds up to the elements. The extensive range of products, from wider profiles to vinyl siding with insulation to polypropylene-based injected molded shingles, has taken vinyl from a product associated with starter homes to the luxury home market. Take the course.

    Posted:
    March 2012
    Subject(s):
    Building Envelope, Siding, Exteriors
    Sponsor:
    Mastic
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Baths for Today and Tomorrow: An Overview of 2010 ADA Standards

    1 LU AIA/HSW

    Thank you for your interest in the codes and standards that govern accessibility requirements. This course explores the demographics that are driving the accessible bath fixture market. All manufacturers must comply with the same requirements in order to meet UFAS and ADA standards. The accessibility standards common to all manufacturers challenge them to evacuate water on a shower floor that has a ¼-inch pitch to the drain. This is made more difficult by the fact that accessible showers have dams with minimal heights. The evolution of accessibility standards, the federal guidelines, and the products that meet these standards will be reviewed. At the end of this course you will be able to list codes and standards that govern accessibility requirements, identify project types that require accessible bath fixtures, and specify bath fixtures and accessories that meet current accessibility guidelines. Take the course.

    Posted:
    September 2011
    Subject(s):
    Codes and Standards, Universal Design, Design
    Sponsor:
    Aquatic
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Specifying Locks to meet 2010 ADA Standards for Schools

    1 LU HSW

    The “2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design” issued by the Department of Justice (DOJ) contain new provisions that directly impact design specifications and construction on school projects completed after March 15, 2012. Failure to comply with newly mandated minimums could generate problems not only for schools and school districts, but also raise liability issues regarding architect responsibility. This course covers critical changes in ADA guidelines, focusing on key aspects relating to schools, ADA students, locks and lockers. We’ll compare functionality, ease of use and features of ADA-compliant locks and non-compliant locks. We’ll look at value-added design advantages, cost issues and long-term operational flexibility factors for you to consider when you are specifying locker locks for your next project. Finally, we’ll detail new product options available to better serve students whose abilities fall within the ADA Standards. Take the course.

    Posted:
    September 2011
    Subject(s):
    Codes and Standards, Locksets and Hardware
    Sponsor:
    Master Lock
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • An Overview of Insulated Concrete Forms

    1 LU AIA/HSW

    ICF’s can meet and exceed the challenges of today’s building requirements. With today’s design challenges and focus on building energy efficient structures, ICF technology can meet and exceed these requirements. Upon completion of the program you will be able to have a better understanding of what an insulated concrete form (ICF) is and what applications they can be used in. Take the course.

    Posted:
    July 2011
    Subject(s):
    Insulating Concrete Forms, Building Envelope
    Sponsor:
    Nudura
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Fiberglass Composites in the Window and Door Industry

    1.0 LU HSW

    Composite materials have been used for thousands of years. New applications are identified each year. As one of the first modern composite materials fiberglass is at the fore front of this innovation. This course will familiarize you with all the basic aspects of fiberglass and specifically target their usefulness in the door and window industry. Once you have completed this course you will be able to discuss how composite materials provide predictable and superior performance characteristics when compared to other window frame material. You will also be able to explain the pultrusion process and identify the specific characteristics of pultruded fiberglass. Finally you will be able to apply this knowledge to determining which window frames will be best for your project. Take the course.

    Posted:
    March 2011
    Subject(s):
    Doors, Windows, Graphic Design
    Sponsor:
    Integrity Windows and Doors
    Certification(s):
    AIA, USGBC
  • Condensing Tankless Water Heaters: Using Propane for the Most Efficient Water Heaters on the Market

    1.0 LU HSW

    This learning unit will address the benefits of a Condensing Tankless Water Heater and explore how retrofitting a home with a Condensing Tankless Water Heater—or installing one in new construction—can offer the most energy efficiency of any water heater, even propane Tankless Water Heaters, which until now have been the most energy-efficient water heaters available. Propane Condensing Tankless Water Heaters are the wave of the future when it comes to super energy-efficient and environmentally friendly water heating. Take the course.

    Posted:
    March 2011
    Subject(s):
    Energy Efficiency, Water Heaters
    Sponsor:
    Propane Education and Research Council
    Certification(s):
    AIA, NAHB, USGBC
  • Beyond Performance Window Materials and their Environmental Impact

    1.0 LU HSW/SD

    You will compare and contrast basic performance qualities, materials origins, carbon footprints, lifecycle analyses and installed performance of four common window framing materials. You will be able to compare and contrast window framing material qualities in detail. A case study of a net-zero home in Chicago showcases how window framing and glass selection are critical to energy performance of a home. Take the course.

    Posted:
    February 2011
    Subject(s):
    Windows, Life-Cycle Assessment, Green Design
    Sponsor:
    Marvin Windows
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Residential Energy Performance Upgrades: an energy, economic, and environmental analysis

    1.0 LU HSW/SD

    Decisions on where and when to invest in residential energy efficient equipment can be tricky for a consumer, especially when it comes to paying a premium for higher efficiency equipment. This course focuses on the typical energy use for average single family detached households. Once you have completed this course you will be able to explain the difference between elective and non-elective energy efficiency measures (EEM) and identify the most beneficial EEMs in each of the five targeted climate zones covered. You will also be able to determine approximate payback periods for EEMs in your projects and to convey the costs and benefits of the EEM options to your clients. Take the course.

    Posted:
    January 2011
    Subject(s):
    Energy Efficiency
    Sponsor:
    Propane Education and Research Council
    Certification(s):
    AIA, NARI, USGBC, NAHB
  • Window Replacement and EPA Regulations

    1.0 LU HSW/SD

    After completing this course you should be able to explain the economic and energy related importance of window replacement; be able to assess existing windows and list replacement options. You should also be able to describe the window replacement process; and explain the role of the architect, contractor and window supplier in the replacement process. Take the course.

    Posted:
    January 2011
    Subject(s):
    Energy-Efficient Windows
    Sponsor:
    Andersen Windows
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Engineered Wood Product Basics—Strong, Safe and Green

    1.0 LU HSW/SD

    Each choice in construction has an impact on the character of the finished product, whether your client wants an environmentally friendly home, a home that wears well over time, or is concerned about price and resale value. Each building starts with a base and a frame. In this course we are focusing on one option for frame design. Engineered wood products (EWP) are a strong, safe and green alternative to steel and dimension lumber for framing residential and light commercial projects.

    Posted:
    January 2011
    Subject(s):
    Green Design, Wood
    Sponsor:
    Roseburg Forest Products
    Certification(s):
    AIA