Launch Slideshow

Design Like You Give a Damn 2 Projects

Design Like You Give a Damn 2 Projects

  • Soe Ker Tie House, Noh Bo, Tak, Thailand

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    Pasi Aalto/TYIN Tegnestue

    The siding of the Soe Ker Tie Hias (Butterfly Houses) in Noh Bo, Tak, Thailand, uses a local bamboo-weaving technique.

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    Weiland Gleich/Archigraphy.com

    The 10x10 Housing Initiative in Freedom Park, Mitchell Plains, Cape Town, South Africa.

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    Eric Hester/ZEROW House

    The ZEROW House on the National Mall.

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    Andrew Lee

    The building's low profile minimizes its impact on the site and surrounding neighborhood, in part by weaving through preexisting trees.

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    Pedro Pegenaute

    Pillars sitting in a pool of water help to keep the building cool.

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    Haas&Hahn

    Artists Jeroen Koolhaas and Dre Urhahn (Haas&Haan) enlisted locals to help create nearly 23,000 square feet of colorful artwork on the exterior of 34 houses in the Rio de Janeiro hillside slum of Praca Cantão.

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    Architecture For Humanity

Architecture for Humanity’s Design Like You Give a Damn: Building Change from the Ground Up  supplements the original by examining more than 100 projects from around the world that deal with issues ranging from constructing basic shelters and implementing renewable energy to post-disaster rebuilding and providing communities with access to food, health care, clean water, and education. Through interviews, project case studies, information on product innovation, and public policy progress updates, as well as 500 color photographs, the text supplements the nonprofit’s first book to serve as a resource for building professionals, local policy makers, and educators interested in sustainable design. Published in May by Abrams Books, the 336-page book retails for $35.