Launch Slideshow

push-pull house, chevy chase, md.

In its second act, this suburban house mixes Modernist forms with those of its traditional postwar neighbors. Working with the existing foundation walls, architect David Jameson split the house in two from front to back.

push-pull house, chevy chase, md.

In its second act, this suburban house mixes Modernist forms with those of its traditional postwar neighbors. Working with the existing foundation walls, architect David Jameson split the house in two from front to back.

  • http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/RA020501066H2_tcm48-290022.jpg

    true

    600

    Anice Hoachlander

    Traditional stucco and clapboard cladding coexist with a copper brise-soleil, which minimizes the house’s scale and reflects light in interesting ways.

  • http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/RA020501066H1_tcm48-290013.jpg

    true

    600

    Anice Hoachlander

    Glass panels in the great room capture the northern light and leafy backyard views.

  • http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/RA020501066H3_tcm48-290031.jpg

    true

    600

    Anice Hoachlander

    The upstairs balcony bridges the master bedroom and the children’s bedrooms.

  • http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/RA020501066H4_tcm48-290040.jpg

    true

    600

    Anice Hoachlander

    Gabled and curved roofs slide past each other, creating an abstract composition and reflecting the division of public and private space.

david jameson architect, alexandria, va.

In its second act, this suburban house mixes Modernist forms with those of its traditional postwar neighbors. Working with the existing foundation walls, architect David Jameson split the house in two from front to back. By inserting a central corridor, he was able to create a prominent gable form on one side that pushes toward the street. The other half of the house, with its modern, curved roof, recedes discreetly toward the rear garden. "The houses on this street have very simple gable forms," Jameson says, "and porches that are low to the street." He evoked those low porches with a lead-coated copper brise-soleil that sweeps across the entryway.

Inside, rooms relate to each other laterally, across the corridor. "You can see from one space to the next, but not necessarily everything that's going on," Jameson says. "It creates a sense of curiosity as you move through the house."

The judges praised the house's sensitive massing. "This was a typical suburban lot that the architect dealt with in a wonderful way," they said.

project architect: David Jameson, David Jameson Architect
general contractor: Bobby Heslip, Heslip Construction, Manassas, Va.
landscape architect: David Jameson Architect
interior designer: David Jameson Architect
project size: 3,800 square feet
site size: 0.125 acres
construction cost: Withheld
photographer: Anice Hoachlander