Launch Slideshow

The neighborhood is based on the socially rich Dutch living street, where shared streets are designed as multipurpose spaces that include parking, playgrounds, gathering places, and landscape systems.

Porchscapes

Porchscapes

  • The neighborhood is based on the socially rich Dutch living street, where shared streets are designed as multipurpose spaces that include parking, playgrounds, gathering places, and landscape systems.

    http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmpF%2Etmp_tcm48-398179.jpg

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    The neighborhood is based on the socially rich Dutch living street, where shared streets are designed as multipurpose spaces that include parking, playgrounds, gathering places, and landscape systems.

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    Courtesy University of Arkansas Community Design Center

    The neighborhood is based on the socially rich Dutch living street, where shared streets are designed as multipurpose spaces that include parking, playgrounds, gathering places, and landscape systems.

  • The meandering stream in this LEED-ND pilot project, designed for Habitat for Humanity, is a recreational alternative to the conventional drainage ditch.

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    The meandering stream in this LEED-ND pilot project, designed for Habitat for Humanity, is a recreational alternative to the conventional drainage ditch.

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    Courtesy University of Arkansas Community Design Center

    The meandering stream in this LEED-ND pilot project, designed for Habitat for Humanity, is a recreational alternative to the conventional drainage ditch.

  • Seasonal stormwater is allowed to overflow the stream into an adjacent meadow.

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    Seasonal stormwater is allowed to overflow the stream into an adjacent meadow.

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    Courtesy University of Arkansas Community Design Center

    Seasonal stormwater is allowed to overflow the stream into an adjacent meadow.

  • Variously configured porches extend living space and connect the houses to the plaza.

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    Variously configured porches extend living space and connect the houses to the plaza.

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    Courtesy University of Arkansas Community Design Center

    Variously configured porches extend living space and connect the houses to the plaza.

  • The porches front common areas and contribute to a vibrant street life.

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    The porches front common areas and contribute to a vibrant street life.

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    Courtesy University of Arkansas Community Design Center

    The porches offer common areas and contribute to a vibrant street life.

  • The neighborhood site plan and context.

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    The neighborhood site plan and context.

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    Courtesy University of Arkansas Community Design Center

    The neighborhood site plan and context.

university of arkansas community design center, fayetteville, ark.

Parks—not pipes. That was the rallying call behind Porchscapes, where a series of water treatment parks is the connective tissue for an entire low-income community. The low-impact development, which received EPA funding, is organized into five smaller neighborhoods, each clustered around a plaza or a landscape system that replaces the conventional retention pond.

The plan borrows from the Dutch idea of a “living street,” which combines walkways, auto courts, and natural-looking bioretention systems with traffic throughways. Facing onto each common area are one-story houses with porches that can be screened or enclosed with storage units. “The porches extend the living area inexpensively and connect these public spaces and the house,” explains project architect Katie Breshears, AIA, LEED AP. The arrangement “creates a better sense of community and starts to develop that ‘I’ll watch your kids if you watch mine’ mentality.”

The judges praised the elegance of the house forms and the innovative site plan. As one succinctly put it, “The strength of the project is that it’s outside in, not inside out.”


Project Credits
principal in charge / project architect: Katie Breshears, AIA, LEED AP, University of Arkansas Community Design Center, uacdc.uark.edu
land planner: Stephen Luoni, Assoc. AIA, University of Arkansas Community Design Center
developer: Wendi Y. Jones, Habitat for Humanity of Washington County, Fayetteville, Ark.
landscape architect: Chris Suneson, RLA, McClelland Consulting Engineers, Fayetteville
project size: 1,150 square feet to 1,250 square feet per unit
site size: 8.8 acres
construction cost: Projected $60 per square foot (not including labor)
sales price: $69,000 to $75,000 per unit
units in project: 43
renderings: Courtesy University of Arkansas Community Design Center

Product Details
exterior siding: James Hardie Building Products www.jameshardie.com; paints/stains/wall finishes: The Sherwin-Williams Co. www.sherwin-williams.com; permeable pavers: Pavestone Co. www.pavestone.com; roofing: TAMKO Building Products www.tamko.com

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