Launch Slideshow

Sheet metal and wood battens clad the exteriors, while cork and fiber-cement boards form the interior finish materials.

project highlights for dan shipley, faia

project highlights for dan shipley, faia

  • Dan Shipley, FAIA, values corrugated metal for its tough character and tactile look.

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    Dan Shipley, FAIA, values corrugated metal for its tough character and tactile look.

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    Danny Turner

    Dan Shipley, FAIA, values corrugated metal for its tough character and tactile look.

  •  He specified it for the cladding of his new office space on the southern edge of downtown Dallas.

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    He specified it for the cladding of his new office space on the southern edge of downtown Dallas.

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    Danny Turner

    He specified it for the cladding of his new office space on the southern edge of downtown Dallas.

  • Metal and wood screens provide passive cooling and privacy to Shipley's office.

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    Metal and wood screens provide passive cooling and privacy to Shipley's office.

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    Charles Davis Smith

    Metal and wood screens provide passive cooling and privacy to Shipley's office.

  • The straightforward building offers Shipley and his staff plenty of space to store material samples, an important component of their client meetings.

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    The straightforward building offers Shipley and his staff plenty of space to store material samples, an important component of their client meetings.

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    Charles Davis Smith

    The straightforward building offers Shipley and his staff plenty of space to store material samples, an important component of their client meetings.

  • On the facade of Ford Trimotor House, a 1,900-square-foot residence in Dallas' Urban Reserve development, vertical metal bands humanize the scale of the corrugated metal walls.

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    On the facade of Ford Trimotor House, a 1,900-square-foot residence in Dallas' Urban Reserve development, vertical metal bands humanize the scale of the corrugated metal walls.

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    James F. Wilson

    On the facade of Ford Trimotor House, a 1,900-square-foot residence in Dallas' Urban Reserve development, vertical metal bands humanize the scale of the corrugated metal walls.

  • The home mixes warm wood detailing...

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    The home mixes warm wood detailing...

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    James F. Wilson

    The home mixes warm wood detailing...

  • ...with metal and concrete.

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    ...with metal and concrete.

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    James F. Wilson

    ...with metal and concrete.

  • Shipley named a new house and studio "Swordfish Trombone House" in tribute to an album by singer-songwriter Tom Waits. The Dallas project blends various materials to create a rich architectural texture.

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    Shipley named a new house and studio "Swordfish Trombone House" in tribute to an album by singer-songwriter Tom Waits. The Dallas project blends various materials to create a rich architectural texture.

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    Craig D. Blackmon FAIA

    Shipley named a new house and studio "Swordfish Trombone House" in tribute to an album by singer-songwriter Tom Waits. The Dallas project blends various materials to create a rich architectural texture.

  • At a 1,490-square-foot project in Dallas' Urban Reserve development, Shipley employed metal grating to form a dramatic entry ramp.

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    At a 1,490-square-foot project in Dallas' Urban Reserve development, Shipley employed metal grating to form a dramatic entry ramp.

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    Charles Davis Smith

    At a 1,490-square-foot project in Dallas' Urban Reserve development, Shipley employed metal grating to form a dramatic entry ramp.

  • Unexpected interior sightlines, such as the view from the living room up through the second-floor staircase...

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    Unexpected interior sightlines, such as the view from the living room up through the second-floor staircase...

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    Charles Davis Smith

    Unexpected interior sightlines, such as the view from the living room up through the second-floor staircase...

  • ...enliven the space without breaking the budget.

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    ...enliven the space without breaking the budget.

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    Charles Davis Smith

    ...enliven the space without breaking the budget.

  • Often, Shipley makes relatively minor adjustments to an existing home that completely change the way his clients live. This 2004 renovation to the rear of a house in Dallas...

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    Often, Shipley makes relatively minor adjustments to an existing home that completely change the way his clients live. This 2004 renovation to the rear of a house in Dallas...

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    Charles Davis Smith

    Often, Shipley makes relatively minor adjustments to an existing home that completely change the way his clients live. This 2004 renovation to the rear of a house in Dallas...

  • ...includes a new master suite, carport, and studio...

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    ...includes a new master suite, carport, and studio...

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    Charles Davis Smith

    ...includes a new master suite, carport, and studio...

  • which connect the building to its backyard.

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    which connect the building to its backyard.

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    Charles Davis Smith

    which connect the building to its backyard.

  • In 2005, Shipley added a new master suite onto a house he designed in 1996.

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    In 2005, Shipley added a new master suite onto a house he designed in 1996.

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    Charles Davis Smith

    In 2005, Shipley added a new master suite onto a house he designed in 1996.

  • The Eulogy, Texas, addition, known as the Freezer Panel Walkout, uses insulated freezer panels as its main structural component.

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    The Eulogy, Texas, addition, known as the Freezer Panel Walkout, uses insulated freezer panels as its main structural component.

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    Charles Davis Smith

    The Eulogy, Texas, addition, known as the Freezer Panel Walkout, uses insulated freezer panels as its main structural component.

  • Sheet metal and wood battens clad the exteriors, while cork and fiber-cement boards form the interior finish materials.

    http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmpFA97%2Etmp_tcm48-620947.jpg

    true

    Sheet metal and wood battens clad the exteriors, while cork and fiber-cement boards form the interior finish materials.

    600

    Charles Davis Smith

    Sheet metal and wood battens clad the exteriors, while cork and fiber-cement boards form the interior finish materials.

  • At the 2001 Tailored House in Highland Park, Texas, Shipley created a subdued exterior that defers to the surrounding older homes.

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    At the 2001 Tailored House in Highland Park, Texas, Shipley created a subdued exterior that defers to the surrounding older homes.

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    Hester + Hardaway

    At the 2001 Tailored House in Highland Park, Texas, Shipley created a subdued exterior that defers to the surrounding older homes.

  • Custom metal detailing, such as a slim, graceful stair railing, pulls the home together.

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    Custom metal detailing, such as a slim, graceful stair railing, pulls the home together.

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    Robert Gries

    Custom metal detailing, such as a slim, graceful stair railing, pulls the home together.

  • Big steel windows made in a local workshop bring in natural light.

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    Big steel windows made in a local workshop bring in natural light.

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    Hester + Hardaway

    Big steel windows made in a local workshop bring in natural light.

  • At a guest house and "party barn" Hico, Texas, industrial materials such as PVC and perforated aluminum...

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    At a guest house and "party barn" Hico, Texas, industrial materials such as PVC and perforated aluminum...

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    Charles Davis Smith

    At a guest house and "party barn" Hico, Texas, industrial materials such as PVC and perforated aluminum...

  • ...complement earthier items like salvaged heart pine boards and indigenous stone.

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    ...complement earthier items like salvaged heart pine boards and indigenous stone.

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    Charles Davis Smith

    ...complement earthier items like salvaged heart pine boards and indigenous stone.

  • Dan Shipley, FAIA, values corrugated metal for its tough character and tactile look.

    Credit: Danny Turner

    Dan Shipley, FAIA, values corrugated metal for its tough character and tactile look.
 

detail-oriented

Shipley admits that accepting so many small projects isn’t always the best financial strategy. But he enjoys and craves the puzzles they pose, and has made smart business moves in other ways. After years of working alone, he expanded slowly and surely, reaching a full-time staff high of seven in 2008. He’s also balanced his portfolio with some institutional work. That diversity has come in handy recently, with private-school and civic projects helping him counter a recession-induced slowdown in residential commissions. The sluggish Dallas housing market has forced him to cut back to two full-time staff members (himself and project architect Jay Smith, AIA, LEED AP.) They’re forging ahead, stepping up the build side of the firm to supplement the design portion.

With the new economic austerity, Shipley’s longtime interest in doing more with less has gained traction among many of his fellow architects. They’d do well to look at the way he handles details, from the most modest of projects up through his high-end work. “His details are personable,” Levy says. “You reach for a door handle and look down and think, ‘Oh, this is cool.’ It’s a friendly, warm architectural language.” Austin, Texas–based Mell Lawrence, FAIA, views Shipley’s details as part of a larger whole. “When you zoom in, you notice all the clever details,” he says. “When you zoom out, you see a well-composed thing that does a lot with light and shadow. He pays so much attention to the composition.”

Sometimes Shipley designs a detail first, and then the project flows from there; in other cases he does the reverse. Either way, he remains in control of the design while still allowing himself leeway for improvisation. “Restraint is one of the salient features of Dan’s work,” says Stephen Sharpe, editor of Texas Architect magazine.

Shipley has spent most of his life in Texas, and the agrarian buildings dotting the rural landscape there serve as some of his biggest influences. He’s even devoted a section of his website to them, under the heading “Roadside Attractions.” The idea of these utilitarian structures created by anonymous builders appeals to his sense that a good building needs a human touch. “A lot of people in the profession are so keen on perfection and precision,” he says. “I see it as more about accuracy and ideas. I’m not interested in perfection—it seems sort of hollow to me.” Instead, he designs each residential project toward a deeper, more complicated goal: to make a good place to live.


 

2010 leadership awards