Launch Slideshow

The Wide Open House is a stock plan development for Hometta.com, a website Min | Day helped found to sell affordable modern homes.

Min | Day Featured Projects

firm partners jeffrey l. day and e.b. min make every site specific.

Min | Day Featured Projects

firm partners jeffrey l. day and e.b. min make every site specific.

  • Jeffrey L. Day and E.B. Min post on the Stones Table, which melds organic form with CNC precision. Together, the pieces form a rectangular table.

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    Jeffrey L. Day and E.B. Min post on the Stones Table, which melds organic form with CNC precision. Together, the pieces form a rectangular table.

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    John Lee/Aurora Select

    Jeffrey L. Day and E.B. Min pose on the Stones Table, which melds organic form with CNC precision. Together, the pieces form a rectangular table.

  • A rendering of the Wide Open House.

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    A rendering of the Wide Open House.

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    Courtesy Min | Day

    A rendering of the Wide Open House.

  • The Wide Open House is a stock plan development for Hometta.com, a website Min | Day helped found to sell affordable modern homes.

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    The Wide Open House is a stock plan development for Hometta.com, a website Min | Day helped found to sell affordable modern homes.

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    Courtesy Min | Day

    The Wide Open House is a stock plan development for Hometta.com, a website Min | Day helped found to sell affordable modern homes.

  • The Lake Okoboji house creates a set of blinders on a narrow lot in rural Iowa, screening close neighbors while gradually opening to lake views.

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    The Lake Okoboji house creates a set of blinders on a narrow lot in rural Iowa, screening close neighbors while gradually opening to lake views.

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    Paul Crosby

    The Lake Okoboji house creates a set of blinders on a narrow lot in rural Iowa, screening close neighbors while gradually opening to lake views.

  • In this penthouse overlooking downtown Omaha, Neb., CNC-cut railing and light filters suggest prairie grasses.

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    In this penthouse overlooking downtown Omaha, Neb., CNC-cut railing and light filters suggest prairie grasses.

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    Paul Crosby

    In this penthouse overlooking downtown Omaha, Neb., CNC-cut railing and light filters suggest prairie grasses.

  • A blue-saturated stairwell in a downtown Omaha, Neb., penthouse heightens the experience of moving upward toward the sky.

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    A blue-saturated stairwell in a downtown Omaha, Neb., penthouse heightens the experience of moving upward toward the sky.

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    Paul Crosby

    A blue-saturated stairwell in a downtown Omaha, Neb., penthouse heightens the experience of moving upward toward the sky.

  • InfoShop, the new reception area for the Bemis Center in Omaha, Neb., provides a spontaneous place for dialogue and debate.

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    InfoShop, the new reception area for the Bemis Center in Omaha, Neb., provides a spontaneous place for dialogue and debate.

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    Larry Gawel

    InfoShop, the new reception area for the Bemis Center in Omaha, Neb., provides a spontaneous place for dialogue and debate.

  • The Bemis Center's reception desk--laminated hardboard with exposed edges over a plywood and steel frame--doubles as a bar surface for gallery events.

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    The Bemis Center's reception desk--laminated hardboard with exposed edges over a plywood and steel frame--doubles as a bar surface for gallery events.

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    Larry Gawel

    The Bemis Center's reception desk--laminated hardboard with exposed edges over a plywood and steel frame--doubles as a bar surface for gallery events.

  • Behind the reception desk, CNC-milled MDF wall panels were cut from a pinwheel aperiodic tiling pattern.

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    Behind the reception desk, CNC-milled MDF wall panels were cut from a pinwheel aperiodic tiling pattern.

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    Larry Gawel

    Behind the reception desk, CNC-milled MDF wall panels were cut from a pinwheel aperiodic tiling pattern.

  • Walnut-stained casework brings texture and spatial definition to a New York City loft.

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    Walnut-stained casework brings texture and spatial definition to a New York City loft.

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    Michael Moran

    Walnut-stained casework brings texture and spatial definition to a New York City loft.

  • The walnut-stained casework in this New York City loft  includes a toy closet, kitchen pantry, desk, and bench, in addition to a media center and closets.

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    The walnut-stained casework in this New York City loft includes a toy closet, kitchen pantry, desk, and bench, in addition to a media center and closets.

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    Michael Moran

    The walnut-stained casework in this New York City loft includes a toy closet, kitchen pantry, desk, and bench, in addition to a media center and closets.

  • The main cube hides a deck and bench.

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    The main cube hides a deck and bench.

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    Michael Moran

    The main cube hides a deck and bench.

  • On the opposite side of this reveal is the kitchen pantry, which also is the light source.

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    On the opposite side of this reveal is the kitchen pantry, which also is the light source.

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    Michael Moran

    On the opposite side of this reveal is the kitchen pantry, which also is the light source.

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    Rising Star / Jeffrey L. Day, AIA, and E.B. Min, AIA, Min | Day

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    Rising Star / Jeffrey L. Day, AIA, and E.B. Min, AIA, Min | Day

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    John Lee/Aurora Select

    Rising Star / Jeffrey L. Day, AIA, and E.B. Min, AIA, Min | Day

  • Jeffrey L. Day and E.B. Min post on the Stones Table, which melds organic form with CNC precision. Together, the pieces form a rectangular table.

    Credit: John Lee/Aurora Select

    Jeffrey L. Day and E.B. Min post on the Stones Table, which melds organic form with CNC precision. Together, the pieces form a rectangular table.
 

the art of improv

Hesse McGraw, curator at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, an art residency program in Omaha, describes Min | Day’s work as “an architecture that remembers it’s meant to be lived in, and that reaches out to its occupants in a generous way.”

Says McGraw, “When you look at the images you can tell there’s a kind of joy or sense of celebration just by the colors and forms, but the way that happens when you occupy these spaces is palpable. There’s a sense of discovery that unfolds over time.”

Their ongoing work with the Bemis Center and other nonprofit artist organizations has inspired an improvisational paradigm that’s quite different from their meticulously controlled projects, and one that would scare most architects. In this realm, too, Min | Day borrows from landscape architecture. “The way landscape architects think about the long-term has inspired us to think about how to do that architecturally,” Day says. “When you can’t depend on rigorous control from start to finish, you seek ways of structuring the experiences to unify the work of others who succeed you.”

It’s an approach they’ve used on restricted-budget private commissions, too. With a portfolio ranging from a wheelchair-accessible suburban residence to urban adaptive reuse, straw bale houses, and repurposed art buildings on a working farm, their practice is hard to pin down. Recently they landed a new category: master planning for a 90-unit housing project in China.

The philosophy that informs all Min | Day’s work, whether experimental or traditional, is that architecture isn’t so much about the formal image as the way a building locks into its site. And that’s something that has to be experienced.

“When the weather is cool here, the breeze comes from the north, and the building shields a beautiful patio,” says client Paul Smith of his Lake Okoboji house. “In warm weather, the breeze comes out of the south. I often sit there with my coffee in the morning and watch the world wake up.”


 

2010 leadership awards