Launch Slideshow

Border House was named for its function as a transitional element between woodland and open meadow. Completed in 2003, it reflects themes common in Teagues work: forms inspired by the landscape and a certain assembled quality.

select projects from harry teague architects

select projects from harry teague architects

  • Harry Teague.

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    Harry Teague.

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    Peter McBride

    Harry Teague.

  • Cement Creek Residence occupies a site that offers both breathtaking views and extreme weather.

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    Cement Creek Residence occupies a site that offers both breathtaking views and extreme weather.

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    Wayne Thom

    Cement Creek Residence occupies a site that offers both breathtaking views and extreme weather.

  • An aluminum-framed corner window contrasts with siding of rusted currugated steel.

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    An aluminum-framed corner window contrasts with siding of rusted currugated steel.

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    Wayne Thom

    An aluminum-framed corner window contrasts with siding of rusted currugated steel.

  • Passive solar strategies help the building cope with winter temperatures that reach double digits below zero.

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    Passive solar strategies help the building cope with winter temperatures that reach double digits below zero.

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    Wayne Thom

    Passive solar strategies help the building cope with winter temperatures that reach double digits below zero.

  • Cement Creek Residence kitchen.

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    Cement Creek Residence kitchen.

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    Wayne Thom

    Cement Creek Residence kitchen.

  • Border House was named for its function as a transitional element between woodland and open meadow. Completed in 2003, it reflects themes common in Teagues work: forms inspired by the landscape and a certain assembled quality.

    http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmpFAA3%2Etmp_tcm48-619054.jpg

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    Border House was named for its function as a transitional element between woodland and open meadow. Completed in 2003, it reflects themes common in Teagues work: forms inspired by the landscape and a certain assembled quality.

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    Paul Warchol

    Border House was named for its function as a transitional element between woodland and open meadow. Completed in 2003, it reflects themes common in Teagues work: forms inspired by the landscape and a certain assembled quality.

  • Border House living area.

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    Border House living area.

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    Paul Warchol

    Border House living area.

  • Border House dining and living areas.

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    Border House dining and living areas.

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    Paul Warchol

    Border House dining and living areas.

  • Border House kitchen.

    http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmpFAA2%2Etmp_tcm48-619051.jpg

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    Border House kitchen.

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    Paul Warchol

    Border House kitchen.

  • Border House living area.

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    Border House living area.

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    Paul Warchol

    Border House living area.

  • Providing affordable housing in Aspen, Colo., Benedict Commons, completed in 1996, breaks up its massed units in street elevations that follow the pattern of the historic downtown.

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    Providing affordable housing in Aspen, Colo., Benedict Commons, completed in 1996, breaks up its massed units in street elevations that follow the pattern of the historic downtown.

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    Timothy Hursley

    Providing affordable housing in Aspen, Colo., Benedict Commons, completed in 1996, breaks up its massed units in street elevations that follow the pattern of the historic downtown.

  • Benedict Commons units open onto a common interior courtyard, connecting via on-grade paths and elevated walkways.

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    Benedict Commons units open onto a common interior courtyard, connecting via on-grade paths and elevated walkways.

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    Timothy Hursley

    Benedict Commons units open onto a common interior courtyard, connecting via on-grade paths and elevated walkways.

  • Benedict Commons courtyard.

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    Benedict Commons courtyard.

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    Timothy Hursley

    Benedict Commons courtyard.

  • Completed in 2000, the Burlingame affordable housing development comprises four housing clusters and a commons building.

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    Completed in 2000, the Burlingame affordable housing development comprises four housing clusters and a commons building.

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    Thorney Lieberman

    Completed in 2000, the Burlingame affordable housing development comprises four housing clusters and a commons building.

  • Prefabricating the units off-site reduced both costs and time under construction.

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    Prefabricating the units off-site reduced both costs and time under construction.

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    Thorney Lieberman

    Prefabricating the units off-site reduced both costs and time under construction.

  • All of the Burlingame development's units open onto a shared outdoor space.

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    All of the Burlingame development's units open onto a shared outdoor space.

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    Thorney Lieberman

    All of the Burlingame development's units open onto a shared outdoor space.

  • Teague traces his affinity for agricultural buildings to a barn residence his grandfather created in the 1930s.

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    Teague traces his affinity for agricultural buildings to a barn residence his grandfather created in the 1930s.

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    Robert Millman

    Teague traces his affinity for agricultural buildings to a barn residence his grandfather created in the 1930s.

  • In the Hacker Residence, completed in 1997, Teague  returned to the imagery of the barn, a motif in his work since his earliest projects.

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    In the Hacker Residence, completed in 1997, Teague returned to the imagery of the barn, a motif in his work since his earliest projects.

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    Robert Millman

    In the Hacker Residence, completed in 1997, Teague returned to the imagery of the barn, a motif in his work since his earliest projects.

  • Hacker Residence interior.

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    Hacker Residence interior.

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    Robert Millman

    Hacker Residence interior.

  • The home and studio for two artists, Shiny Metal House (1984) makes use of materials common in agricultural buildings and mobile homes.

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    The home and studio for two artists, Shiny Metal House (1984) makes use of materials common in agricultural buildings and mobile homes.

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    Timothy Hursley

    The home and studio for two artists, Shiny Metal House (1984) makes use of materials common in agricultural buildings and mobile homes.

  • Teague chose metal siding materials for the way their appearance changes along with lighting conditions.

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    Teague chose metal siding materials for the way their appearance changes along with lighting conditions.

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    Timothy Hursley

    Teague chose metal siding materials for the way their appearance changes along with lighting conditions.

  • Translucent fiberglass panels diffuse the often brilliant, focused mountain sunlight.

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    Translucent fiberglass panels diffuse the often brilliant, focused mountain sunlight.

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    Timothy Hursley

    Translucent fiberglass panels diffuse the often brilliant, focused mountain sunlight.

  • Harry Teague.

    Credit: Peter McBride/Aurora Select

    Harry Teague.
 

Given Harry Teague’s family background, it would be surprising if he hadn’t become a designer of some kind. His grandfather, the pioneering industrial designer Walter Dorwin Teague, penned Art Deco cameras for Kodak in the 1920s and 1930s and served on the design board of the 1939 New York World’s Fair. His father was a car designer. Harry Teague, 66, remembers growing up “in an ambience where everything was judged: Every building, every product, everything.” Amid this ongoing critique of the made world, he was exposed to some of the icons of 20th-century design. “When I was a baby, I was in a hammock on a Herreshoff S-Boat,” he says. In the workshop of his family’s northern New Jersey home, “we restored a Type 37 Grand Prix Bugatti.” But, destined or not, Teague’s career as an architect diverged from the beaten path of his forebears. The difference can be summed up in a single word: Colorado.

As a newly minted Dartmouth graduate in 1966, Teague spent a year working for Aspen, Colo.–based architect Fritz Benedict, a Frank Lloyd Wright disciple who designed the master plans for the Colorado ski towns of Vail, Snowmass, and Breckenridge. “He had a rich sense for the mountain landscape. I learned a ton from him,” says Teague, who calls his internship “more like an initiation.” In 1969, on summer break from architecture studies at Yale University, he returned with some fellow students to build sprayed-concrete domes. “The next summer we found a client and did a house,” Teague says. He made the pilgrimage annually throughout his Yale years, producing experimental work for adventurous clients. “It was crazy,” he says now, “but it didn’t cost much.”

lighting out

Teague’s Yale thesis project was an innovative design for the alternative Aspen Community School, and after graduation he and group of friends returned to the mountains to build it. “When we came out [of school], people went in some different directions, some to the bigger firms,” he remembers. “And then there were those of us who were perfectly comfortable camping out in order to do what we wanted to do.” Adopting the moniker SLOW (for Society of Loosely Organized Workers), the group lived in camper trailers on the site, where, Teague recalls, the nearest neighbor was the famously erratic journalist Hunter S. Thompson. “He actually shot out the lantern of one of our campers.”

Teague’s approach to architecture reflected the openness of the times. Through his work at Yale, then under the deanship of Charles Moore, “I got a sense that architecture could work in a social context as well as a physical context.” The school design grew out of extensive interviews with students, parents, and teachers. Based on an interactive model of education—Teague used garage doors to open classrooms to a central courtyard—and inspiration from Italian Renaissance architect Francesco di Giorgio, the building made novel use of log construction. It was an immediate success (and an enduring one; some 40 years later, it remains the home of a thriving community institution). Further educational projects were not forthcoming, Teague says, “but we did have wonderful [residential] clients who liked this crazy idea we had with logs—the economy, the exuberance.” While most of his colleagues drifted away after the project was finished, Teague stayed on, adopting the SLOW Construction name for his own design/build firm.

Yale had emphasized hands-on construction experience, and running a design/build operation extended that practice. “I learned a ton and got very confident with materials,” Teague says. But after a time, “my learning curve flattened out. I would design for one month and build for 11. I was anxious to develop my design more.” A turning point came in a commission for another nascent institution, the Anderson Ranch Arts Center, where Teague converted an old barn to gallery space and offices. “That was probably the last job I pounded nails on,” he remembers, “and it was with some reluctance, because there’s something wonderful about going home at the end of the day and having produced something tangible.” But if he lost his calluses, Teague found his groove as a regional modernist. “I developed this vernacular of working with old buildings, and adding things to them that were new—and obviously so—but worked with the old things.” The project also introduced him to the clientele that has supported his residential practice ever since.