Photo of the Day:

Top: The landmark India Gate lit up; Bottom: The same location in darkness when the lights are turned out for one hour to mark Earth Hour, in New Delhi, India, Saturday, March 29, 2014. Earth Hour is a global call to turn off lights for 60 minutes to highlight the global climate change.

Top: The landmark India Gate lit up; Bottom: The same location in darkness when the lights are turned out for one hour to mark Earth Hour, in New Delhi, India, Saturday, March 29, 2014. Earth Hour is a global call to turn off lights for 60 minutes to highlight the global climate change.

Credit: Altaf Qadri/AP


Tweet of the Day: 

Video of the Day: Charles Renfro, AIA, of DS+R talks to T Magazine. [The New York Times]

Number of the Day—125: The Eiffel Tower turned 125 yesterday. [Time]

3 More Stories for Tuesday:

Affordable housing is at the top of New York mayor Bill de Blasio’s agenda, citing the Domino Sugar development as the model for his approach to building or preserving 200,000 affordable apartments in the next decade. [New York Daily News]

British architect Terry Farrell conducted an independent review of the UK’s architecture policy. Here are his conclusions. [The Guardian]

The firm TYIN Tegnestue designed small bamboo and timber structures for an orphanage. [Wired]

Critics Corner:

The Guardian’s Rowan Moore on London’s changing skyline: “The city needs a clearer, more precise framework, one that states where height is acceptable and where not. It can identify opportunities for vertical growth as well as restrictions.” [The Guardian]

San Francisco Chronicle’s John King on the Moscone Convention Center: “San Francisco may be the only city on the continent that expects a two-block chunk of downtown to flourish as both a major event facility and a variegated public park.” [SF Gate]

Los Angeles Times’s Christopher Hawthorne on Emerson College: “the sheer striking presence of the building on Sunset gives me at least a modest amount of hope for future architectural experiments in Los Angeles — especially ones that will replace the brooding quality of Mayne's buildings with something less aggressively downcast and more productively humane. [Los Angeles Times]

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