Launch Slideshow

peter pfeiffer

peter pfeiffer

  • http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmp1F04%2Etmp_tcm48-242739.jpg

    true

    600

    Connie Moberley

    PfeifferÕs home (top and left) demonstrates how a Craftsman-inspired house can be infused with green strategies. The architect linked the homeÕs watercooled air-conditioning system to the swimming pool (above left) to provide free pool heat in fall and spring, and the living/dining/kitchen area (above) opens onto a screened porch.

  • http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmp1F05%2Etmp_tcm48-242746.jpg

    true

    600

    Connie Moberley

    PfeifferÕs home (top and left) demonstrates how a Craftsman-inspired house can be infused with green strategies. The architect linked the homeÕs watercooled air-conditioning system to the swimming pool (above left) to provide free pool heat in fall and spring, and the living/dining/kitchen area (above) opens onto a screened porch.

  • http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmp1F06%2Etmp_tcm48-242753.jpg

    true

    600

    Connie Moberley

    Pfeiffer’s home (top and left) demonstrates how a Craftsman-inspired house can be infused with green strategies. The architect linked the home’s watercooled air-conditioning system to the swimming pool (above left) to provide free pool heat in fall and spring, and the living/dining/kitchen area (above) opens onto a screened porch.

  • http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmp1F07%2Etmp_tcm48-242760.jpg

    true

    600

    Connie Moberley

    Pfeiffer’s home (top and left) demonstrates how a Craftsman-inspired house can be infused with green strategies. The architect linked the home’s watercooled air-conditioning system to the swimming pool (above left) to provide free pool heat in fall and spring, and the living/dining/kitchen area (above) opens onto a screened porch.

  • http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmp1F08%2Etmp_tcm48-242767.jpg

    true

    600

    Connie Moberley

    The Phipps Cannatti Residence (top) in Austin, Texas, achieved the highest possible rating in the city’s Green Building Program. Inside, the house incorporates recessed fluorescent lighting, locally harvested wood flooring, and locally quarried limestone for the fireplace.

  • http://www.residentialarchitect.com/Images/tmp1F09%2Etmp_tcm48-242774.jpg

    true

    600

    Connie Moberley

    The Phipps Cannatti Residence (top) in Austin, Texas, achieved the highest possible rating in the city’s Green Building Program. Inside, the house incorporates recessed fluorescent lighting, locally harvested wood flooring, and locally quarried limestone for the fireplace.

“My partner and I have been wondering [about this]. I think we want to diversify into other building types. About 80 percent of our work [right now] is homes. I also will continue spreading the ‘gospel of green.' I expect to continue doing this until green building has become so ubiquitous that it is no longer considered unique.”

 

10 architects making a difference

  • kelly denk and john vetter

    Vetter Denk Architects has taken the post-industrial town of Green Bay, Wis., by storm. Block upon block of prime waterfront footage, a marvelous working river—“urban theater like you wouldn't believe,” says John Vetter, AIA—and the city had turned its back on it.

     
  • marianne cusato

    It's fast, dignified, affordable, and flexible. It's the Katrina Cottage, Marianne Cusato's nifty alternative to the ugly FEMA trailers that were handed out after Hurricane Katrina.

     
  • andrés duany

    Two months after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita flattened huge swathes of the Gulf Coast last summer, a flotilla of Congress for the New Urbanism members descended on Mississippi to design a way out of the devastation.