Launch Slideshow

peter pfeiffer

peter pfeiffer

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    Connie Moberley

    PfeifferÕs home (top and left) demonstrates how a Craftsman-inspired house can be infused with green strategies. The architect linked the homeÕs watercooled air-conditioning system to the swimming pool (above left) to provide free pool heat in fall and spring, and the living/dining/kitchen area (above) opens onto a screened porch.

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    Connie Moberley

    PfeifferÕs home (top and left) demonstrates how a Craftsman-inspired house can be infused with green strategies. The architect linked the homeÕs watercooled air-conditioning system to the swimming pool (above left) to provide free pool heat in fall and spring, and the living/dining/kitchen area (above) opens onto a screened porch.

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    Connie Moberley

    Pfeiffer’s home (top and left) demonstrates how a Craftsman-inspired house can be infused with green strategies. The architect linked the home’s watercooled air-conditioning system to the swimming pool (above left) to provide free pool heat in fall and spring, and the living/dining/kitchen area (above) opens onto a screened porch.

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    Connie Moberley

    Pfeiffer’s home (top and left) demonstrates how a Craftsman-inspired house can be infused with green strategies. The architect linked the home’s watercooled air-conditioning system to the swimming pool (above left) to provide free pool heat in fall and spring, and the living/dining/kitchen area (above) opens onto a screened porch.

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    Connie Moberley

    The Phipps Cannatti Residence (top) in Austin, Texas, achieved the highest possible rating in the city’s Green Building Program. Inside, the house incorporates recessed fluorescent lighting, locally harvested wood flooring, and locally quarried limestone for the fireplace.

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    Connie Moberley

    The Phipps Cannatti Residence (top) in Austin, Texas, achieved the highest possible rating in the city’s Green Building Program. Inside, the house incorporates recessed fluorescent lighting, locally harvested wood flooring, and locally quarried limestone for the fireplace.

“I am somewhat a product of the environmental movement of the 1970s. I grew up around construction, particularly residential remodeling projects, [but] it was the advent of the Earth Day celebrations, and then the Arab Oil Embargo of the early '70s, that galvanized my conviction to combine my interests in building and design with my concerns for the environment and energy efficiency. Designing buildings to rely less on imported energy and that lived ‘lightly' on the environment became my focus, and I stuck with it.”