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Estes/Twombly Architects' office occupies the former sanctuary of a 1933 church building in Newport, R.I.

Estes/Twombly's Modern Office Space in Newport, R.I.

Estes/Twomby Architects' office occupies a 1933 church building.

Estes/Twombly's Modern Office Space in Newport, R.I.

Estes/Twomby Architects' office occupies a 1933 church building.

  • Estes/Twombly Architects office occupies the former sanctuary of a 1933 church building in Newport, R.I.

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    Estes/Twombly Architects office occupies the former sanctuary of a 1933 church building in Newport, R.I.

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    Warren Jagger Photography

    Estes/Twombly Architects’ office occupies the former sanctuary of a 1933 church building in Newport, R.I.

  • Translucent panels on a cedar framework enclose the conference room.

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    Translucent panels on a cedar framework enclose the conference room.

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    Warren Jagger Photography

    Translucent panels on a cedar framework enclose the conference room.

  • The building's entry elevation.

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    The building's entry elevation.

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    Warren Jagger Photography

    The building's entry elevation.

Estes/Twombly Architects’ knack for harmonizing historical and modern architectural forms is very much on display in the firm’s Newport, R.I., office, the former sanctuary of a 1933 brick church. During a renovation several years ago, says partner Peter Twombly, “we took out everything that wasn’t original fabric.” Into the spare, wainscoted room the firm then introduced gently contrasting contemporary elements: a birch-clad kitchen, a translucent, cedar-framed conference room, and birch-and-steel workstations.

Unfinished steel I-beams and tie rods restrain a roof structure that had begun to spread, and the material repeats in exposed HVAC ducts, plan-storage cabinets, and the conference room's barn-door hardware. Industrial lighting fixtures hang from the 19-foot ceiling, supplemented by banks of north-facing skylights. Underscoring the balance of past and present, the conference room's new windows look out on the still-operational Cardines Field, one of the country's earliest baseball diamonds.