Launch Slideshow

embedded architecture

embedded architecture

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    Raimund Koch

    For Howard Sutcliffe and Brigitte Shim, house and landscape often mirror the same idea. At the Ravine Guest House (above and left), an indoor-outdoor fireplace ties the interior to an open deck, and its operable fire-glass window transmits light between the two spaces. The roof floats on a band of structural glass channels, held within a steel frame hung from the roof by stainless steel cables.

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    Raimund Koch

    For Howard Sutcliffe and Brigitte Shim, house and landscape often mirror the same idea. At the Ravine Guest House (above and left), an indoor-outdoor fireplace ties the interior to an open deck, and its operable fire-glass window transmits light between the two spaces. The roof floats on a band of structural glass channels, held within a steel frame hung from the roof by stainless steel cables.

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    James Dow

    At the L-shaped Weathering Steel House, a lily pool slips between the house’s two wings, reflecting dappled light into the living and dining rooms, and then spills into a swimming pool on axis with the CN Tower that defines Toronto’s skyline.

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    James Dow

    Sculptural cutouts reinforce the steel-clad house’s spatial organization. The lower stair landing terminates the pool’s axis (above, right). An inverted bay window drops a pool of light on the stairwell to the second floor (above, left), where the two windows help to form a bridge between the master bedroom and the children’s wing.

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    James Dow

    Sculptural cutouts reinforce the steel-clad house’s spatial organization. The lower stair landing terminates the pool’s axis (above, right). An inverted bay window drops a pool of light on the stairwell to the second floor (above, left), where the two windows help to form a bridge between the master bedroom and the children’s wing.

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    Howard Sutcliffe

    At the Muskoka Boathouse (above and top), porches and stairs occupy the layer between the finely crafted sleeping cabin and its outer skin of heavy timbers salvaged from a demolished warehouse.

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    James Dow

    At the Muskoka Boathouse (above and top), porches and stairs occupy the layer between the finely crafted sleeping cabin and its outer skin of heavy timbers salvaged from a demolished warehouse.

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    James Dow

    Limned in light, the Island House is tightly knitted with the landscape. Green roofsÑthe upper one a wildflower meadow, the lower one planted with sedum speciesÑblend with the ground plane, which is mowed several times a year with a clover mix harvested by a local farmer.

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    James Dow

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    James Dow

    The lily pool faces the St. Lawrence River.

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    James Dow

    The Rundles Restaurant and Tower House (below, left) in Stratford, Ontario, were designed as an urban ensemble contrasting with the buildings on either side. The renovated restaurant (the low building to the left of the Tower House) connects to the owner's three-story residence via a glassceilinged hallway and a shared monolithic concrete wall. Inside the house, a bay window overlooks the street (bottom). Interior spaces spiral upward around a central woodframed “light court” (below, right).

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    James Dow

    The Rundles Restaurant and Tower House (below, left) in Stratford, Ontario, were designed as an urban ensemble contrasting with the buildings on either side. The renovated restaurant (the low building to the left of the Tower House) connects to the owner's three-story residence via a glassceilinged hallway and a shared monolithic concrete wall. Inside the house, a bay window overlooks the street (bottom). Interior spaces spiral upward around a central woodframed “light court” (below, right).

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    James Dow

    The Rundles Restaurant and Tower House (below, left) in Stratford, Ontario, were designed as an urban ensemble contrasting with the buildings on either side. The renovated restaurant (the low building to the left of the Tower House) connects to the owner's three-story residence via a glassceilinged hallway and a shared monolithic concrete wall. Inside the house, a bay window overlooks the street (bottom). Interior spaces spiral upward around a central woodframed “light court” (below, right).