Launch Slideshow

2009 leadership awards / top firm: the miller|hull partnership

the miller|hull partnership creates regional architecture with national impact.

2009 leadership awards / top firm: the miller|hull partnership

the miller|hull partnership creates regional architecture with national impact.

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    Art Grice

    The Miller|Hull Partnership meld modernism, environmental sensitivity, and regional flavor in the Michaels/Sisson Residence.

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    The Miller|Hull Partnership

    Despite its diminutive size, the Novotny Cabin packed enough design punch to draw nationwide attention.

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    Michael Shopenn

    Despite its diminutive size, the Novotny Cabin packed enough design punch to draw nationwide attention.

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    Michael Shopenn

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    Ernie Duncan

    Located in central Washington state, the Campbell Orchard Residence responds to site conditions very different from those of the firm’s home turf on the green shores of Puget Sound.

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    James F. Housel

    Miller|Hull's first multifamily project, 1310 E. Union Lofts, adapts the cabin aesthetic to an urban milieu.

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    Nic Lehoux

    A nine-story condominium tower in downtown Chicago, 156 W. Superior brings the firm’s structural rationality and environmental focus to its first major residential commission outside the Pacific Northwest. Miller|Hull collaborated with Chicago-based Studi

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    Stephen Cridland

    The tiny, off-the-grid Marquand Retreat takes simplicity to a sublime extreme. The tower holds a cistern.

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    James F. Housel

    The Roddy/Bale Residence applies the openness, transparency, and outdoor access of the fIrm's early cabin projects to the larger canvas of a "luxury home."

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    James F. Housel

    The Roddy/Bale Residence applies the openness, transparency, and outdoor access of the fIrm's early cabin projects to the larger canvas of a "luxury home."

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    Stephen Cridland

    The tiny, off-the-grid Marquand Retreat takes simplicity to a sublime extreme. The tower holds a cistern.

Miller|Hull's public work has given it a high profile in the region, but the firm has stood at the center of Seattle's architectural community almost since its founding. “When we were all younger, we used to meet once a month and present our work to each other,” says James L. Cutler, FAIA, of Bainbridge Island, Wash.-based Cutler Anderson Architects, who has competed amicably with Miller|Hull ever since. Partner Norm Strong served as president of the AIA's Seattle chapter (and later as AIA National vice president). Through his long affiliation with the University of Washington, where he now chairs the Department of Architecture, Miller has influenced a generation of young architects. He also documented the movement of which his firm is a part in his 2005 book, Toward a New Regionalism: Environmental Architecture in the Pacific Northwest (University of Washington Press, $35). “The firm's partners have been incredibly influential among architects like myself, who wanted to follow in their footsteps,” says Lane Williams, AIA, of Seattle-based COOP 15. “They have a great feel for materials, and long before building green became popular, they had a great feel for the environment.”

Miller|Hull's environmental focus continues to deepen. Having long toiled toward the goal of net-zero energy use, the firm has now begun to apply the same standard to water use. “Water—that's the latest holy grail,” Hull says. But Miller|Hull has never been a green architecture firm, per se. The principals characterize their approach as emphatically rational. Each Miller|Hull project explores a set of problems, paring away extraneous matter until nothing remains but the essential solution. “We've always been strong structuralists,” Hull explains, and not simply in revealing engineering loads. Whether they be gravitational, climatic, biological, or cultural, “we're always trying to express in our architecture these forces with which we're working.”


 

milestones

1980: Founded firm
1982: Mercy Earth Shelter Residence sets course of environmentally responsible design
1990: Novotny Cabin earns nationwide recognition; David Miller, FAIA, becomes associate professor at the University of Washington
1998: AIA/COTE Top Ten Award, Patagonia Distribution Center
1999: Monograph, Ten Houses (Rockport Press); AIA National Honor Award, Olympic College
2000: AIA National Honor Award, Point Roberts Border Station; AIA/COTE Top Ten Award, Bainbridge Island City Hall
2001: First multifamily project: 1310 E. Union Lofts; monograph, Miller|Hull: Architects of the Pacific Northwest (Princeton Architectural Press)
2003: AIA National Architecture Firm Award; AIA/COTE Top Ten Award, Fisher Pavilion
2004: AIA/COTE Top Ten Award, Pierce County Environmental Services Building
2005: Norman Strong, FAIA, LEED AP, elected AIA National vice president
2009: Monograph, The Miller|Hull Partnership: Public Works (Princeton Architectural Press); Miller elected 2010 chair of National COTE Advisory Group