Launch Slideshow

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rebuilding haiti

Andrés Duany and his staff at Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co. (DPZ) have designed a prefab prototype for Haiti.

rebuilding haiti

Andrés Duany and his staff at Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co. (DPZ) have designed a prefab prototype for Haiti.

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    Courtesy Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co.

    The DPZ prefab cabin could be deployed in various urban, suburban, and rural settings.
  • Andres Duany and his staff at Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co. created a prototype of the Haiti Cabin for manufacture by InnoVida Holdings.

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    Andres Duany and his staff at Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co. created a prototype of the Haiti Cabin for manufacture by InnoVida Holdings.

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    Courtesy Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co.

    Andres Duany and his staff at Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co. created a prototype of the Haiti Cabin for manufacture by InnoVida Holdings.

  • The floorplan for the Haiti Cabin prototype designed by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co. for manufacture by InnoVida Holdings.

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    The floorplan for the Haiti Cabin prototype designed by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co. for manufacture by InnoVida Holdings.

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    Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co.

    The floorplan for the Haiti Cabin prototype designed by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co. for manufacture by InnoVida Holdings.

  • Duany and his colleagues envisioned several different layouts for the cabin, depending on the unit's location and the living situation of its occupants.

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    Duany and his colleagues envisioned several different layouts for the cabin, depending on the unit's location and the living situation of its occupants.

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    Courtesy Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co.

    Duany and his colleagues envisioned several different layouts for the cabin, depending on the unit's location and the living situation of its occupants.

  • DPZ also suggested various configurations based on density and geographical conditions.

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    DPZ also suggested various configurations based on density and geographical conditions.

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    Courtesy Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co.

    DPZ also suggested various configurations based on density and geographical conditions.

Web extra: prefab potential

After Hurricane Katrina, Palo Alto, Calif., architect Joseph Bellomo, AIA, and his staff at Bellomo Architects decided to explore the concept of modular emergency housing. They came up with House Arc, a prefab, off-the-grid prototype (see image below). The curvilinear, 250-square-foot unit consists of a plywood substrate on a strong but lightweight steel tube skeleton, and is clad in Western red cedar. According to Bellomo, House Arc has performed “excellently” in tests of its strength versus seismic and wind forces.

For Bellomo, who also is a partner in a company that makes bike racks out of steel tubing, the structure’s value lies in its flexibility and mobility. It can serve as a permanent dwelling, and can be made in larger sizes. Or it can be taken apart and redeployed many times over in emergency situations. “It’s a viable solution for a lot of different kinds of housing,” he says. Although the prototype cost $18,000 to produce, Bellomo says that figure would drop “drastically” if House Arc were manufactured in larger quantities.

The prototype is about to be disassembled and shipped to Hawaii, where it will be re-assembled atop a concrete foundation in late May. Bellomo hopes that House Arc will be used in Haiti and/or other disaster-struck, warm-climate regions. – meghan drueding

  • Bellomo Architects superimposed a photo of the House Arc prototype onto an image of its future site in Hawaii. The 250-square-foot unit is designed to provide natural cooling in warm and tropical climates.

    Credit: Courtesy Bellomo Architects, www.bellomoarchitects.com

    Bellomo Architects superimposed a photo of the House Arc prototype onto an image of its future site in Hawaii. The 250-square-foot unit is designed to provide natural cooling in warm and tropical climates.

Other Hanley Wood stories on Haiti:

Rebuilding Haiti Will Take More Than Just Money

The Disaster Proof House

A Plan for Haiti